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I am a UK citizen who is currently working in Canada for one year under the young professionals program. I am planning on visiting the US several times over the duration of my stay in Canada but each trip will be no more than 4-5 days. Do I need to apply for a separate visa waiver for each trip?

The expiry date for the waiver lasts until next year but part of the information given in it is the address of where am I staying. As I am visiting different parts on each trip this would make the waiver incorrect the second time I enter so does this mean I should apply for multiple waivers?

Any help is greatly appreciated.

  • Your address is not important re the ESTA. They would like you to update it on the ESTA look up site, but there is no requirement to do so. – CGCampbell Sep 4 '15 at 21:55
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In exactly your situation I have used the same visa waiver multiple times. You just hang on to the I94/W and re-present it next time you visit, as long as it hasn't expired. While technically you should hand in the I94/W when you leave for the last time, I never had any trouble with failing to do that.

  • If you do not hand it back in, it may look as if you are spending a lot of time in the USA. This can cause problems. – Calchas Sep 5 '15 at 16:09
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    All I can say is that it never has in my case. I think they are used to people who don't hand it back because they might come again, and then don't. – DJClayworth Sep 6 '15 at 0:11
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You are talking about a visa waiver, which is granted or declined by the CBP each time you enter the USA. You do not need to "apply" for a visa waiver in advance, except in some circumstances you must have a valid ESTA, which is a separate thing.

Separate to this, is the Electronic System for Travel Authorisation (ESTA). This is not needed if you are entering the USA by land. If you are arriving by a scheduled air or sea carrier, you will need to apply for an ESTA. It is usually valid for two years, unless your passport expires. You do not need to update the details on the ESTA once it is valid.

You do not need to update the address in the ESTA. If you fill out a landing card, then CBP will have your address from that. If you use an Automated Passport Control machine or a Global Entry machine, CBP don't seem to care about your address in the USA.

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