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I'm looking at an international flight and the return segment involves changing airports from John F. Kennedy Airport (JFK) to LaGuardia Airport (LGA). The airline changes as well, from British Airways to Virgin America.

If I purchase this ticket from Skyscanner Ltd. and if there is a delay, will I be taken care of and put on a different flight on Virgin America, or does that become my responsibility at that point?

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    If it's the same itinerary and there is a delay then airlines usually do their best to accommodate getting you there. Problem is You have to get from JFK to LGA, which is not their responsibility. – Karlson Sep 2 '15 at 21:53
  • So basically, I'm guessing there is no guarantee with such a ticket which involves an airport change. – edocetirwi Sep 2 '15 at 22:07
  • @edocetirwi The airlines will usually have a minimum connecting time (MCT) between the airports. If your incoming flight is so delayed that you have less than the MCT left to transfer, they should put you on a later flight. – lambshaanxy Sep 2 '15 at 22:29
  • I'd suggest buying that ticket from a "bricks and mortar" travel agent, rather than an OTA (online travel agent). A proper travel agent can get it all on one ticket, which would mean you'd be protected against delays. If it's on two different tickets, then you'd be on your own – Gagravarr Sep 2 '15 at 22:36
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    @AndrewLazarus I've seen one with an AA flight into LHR, Aer Lingus flight from LGW to Dublin, on 125 (BA) stock. Can be done! – Gagravarr Sep 3 '15 at 8:34
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It sounds like you are booking two separate flights - one to JFK; and then another separate trip outbound from LGA.

These are unrelated; which means that your luggage won't be checked through, and you'll have to check in at LGA to receive your boarding pass for the second flight.

So to answer your question regarding the delay - it is solely your responsibility as Virgin America will not have any knowledge of your British Airways flight - even if you told them; they are not liable for any compensation to you.

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    VIrgin America and British Airlines have an "interline agreement", which is what matters when it comes to booking a single ticket. It has nothing to do with "partner" airlines. That's not to say that this isn't 2 tickets, but your reason for assuming it is (and thus your answer) is wrong. – Doc Sep 3 '15 at 5:50
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    Do you have a reference for that interline agreement? I don't see a reference for it anywhere. – Burhan Khalid Sep 3 '15 at 5:54
  • Agreed with BurhanKhalid - I can't find details of it anywhere @Doc? – Mark Mayo Sep 8 '15 at 10:09

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