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I will fly from Marseille through Amsterdam to Berlin TXL with Airfrance/KLM and I would like to take a large jar of Nutella. It's new and unopened.

Since it's not liquid there should not be a problem taking it, right?

Nutella glass

  • 8
    (Schengen is irrelevant) The rules also cover “gels” so it might still be a problem. But why do you want to take it? Simply convenience? In that case, you might simply risk it. If they force you to throw it away, Nutella is easy to source in Berlin. – Relaxed Sep 1 '15 at 9:18
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    @JonathanReez This is not a duplicate, as the other question is about customs only, whereas this is about admissibility for hand luggage only. – DCTLib Sep 1 '15 at 9:19
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    Well, you can bring along the empty glass - if you have checked luggage, putting it there (wrapped into a plastic bag and clothes) is another option. – DCTLib Sep 1 '15 at 9:29
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    You should maybe send the jar via postal package. – Vincent Sep 1 '15 at 13:13
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    If they don't let you through security with it, you could just do like the woman with the bottle of cognac and eat the whole jar. ;-) – R.. Sep 1 '15 at 15:27
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Nutella is pretty similar to toothpaste in terms of viscosity. Since toothpaste counts as a liquid (source: http://ec.europa.eu/transport/modes/air/security/aviation-security-policy/lags_en.htm), it is reasonably safe to assume that Nutella does so as well.

Also, this page lists "pastes, jams and jellies" as liquids. The latter page is for British Airways flights out of the UK, but it is reasonably safe to assume that the rules are very similar for departures from France.

But you may of course be in luck that the security officer won't see Nutella as a problem. Since — as Relaxed wrote — Nutella is easy to obtain in Berlin, the cost/benefit ratio of bringing it along is pretty low. But I get your point of trying to bring it along. The German Wikipedia page for Nutella states that the version from France is actually slightly different to the German one.

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    I'd say you'd need to be extremely lucky to be allowed to take it on the plane. It's a gel; gels are prohibited. If you get it on board, it's because the security officer made a mistake. – David Richerby Sep 1 '15 at 12:06
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    You will have to throw it away at the security check. I saw it several times already, all across Europe: be it industrial and sealed Nutella or homemade jam from grandma, that's a gel and prohibited in cabin luggage (apart if you bought it from the duty-free shops). The only exception to the rule is baby food if you have a baby (it will only get scanned in a mass spectrometer and you may have to taste it) – but you'd have to convince the officer that you feed your baby with Nutella (good luck!). – tricasse Sep 1 '15 at 13:00
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    @tricasse: Throw it away or eat it. :-) – R.. Sep 1 '15 at 15:28
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    @R..: Well, at least you wouldn't get drunk as this woman did, but your digestive system might not appreciate a pound or two of Nutella all at once… ;-) – tricasse Sep 1 '15 at 15:46
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No. Plain and simple. Nutella is basically a gel and honestly I tried once to ask 2 different airports by sending them an email, whether similar things were allowed. They said they are not. Anyway, Nutella doesn't cost a lot and you could try to "sacrifice" a glass of it, but I wouldn't do the same with others gastronomic specialities.

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As stated in previous answers, Nutella will not be allowed in the cabin. However, you might find Nutella at the airport's duty-free shops (after you check-in and enter the boarding area). If bought there, then you can bring it in the cabin.

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    The OP is interested in the glass, it's not as if Nutella were not available in Germany. – Quora Feans Sep 1 '15 at 12:15
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    Glass is allowed, as long as they don't contain fluids. This can be seen here : aeroportsdeparis.fr/passagers/preparation-vol/bagages/…. So the issue is getting into the plane with a glass full of a fluid. This is only possible when bought in the boarding area. – SCO Sep 1 '15 at 13:12
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    @SCO If you just want the glass, the obvious solution is to eat the contents and then wash it out before going through security. I can think of worse punishments than being forced to eat Nutella. I imagine you might even find some volunteers to help you! – dodgethesteamroller Sep 1 '15 at 18:23
  • @dodeg : upvoted ! Still, if the jar design is available in a duty free shop, he will enjoy the glass jar and the content ;) But you are right, finding Nutella lovers is easy indeed ! – SCO Sep 2 '15 at 10:52
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I took two jars of ovomaltine through Geneva airport last month. Very modern scanning machines. The items were noted by the inspector, but then passed through. I kept these in the fridge the night before which may have helped, but I doubt this would always happen.

  • You really mean Ovomaltine, the spread (for bread), and not Ovomaltine, the powder for milk drinks, right? The latter also comes in (plastic) jars, which is why I'm asking. – DCTLib Oct 19 '18 at 11:26
  • Ye, I do mean the spread. But my daughter tried the same in Toulouse airport last week, and it was confiscated. – Charles Taylor Oct 22 '18 at 7:19
  • I had microwave curry ready meals confiscated in LGW recently. It's mostly random. – simbabque Oct 23 '18 at 8:52
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Make sure the Nutella is really cold, so it's solid and not gel-like :-) Of course, transit in Amsterdam will be a pain...

More seriously, I expect the actual decision is based on what it looks like when going through the scanner, which is probably based on the proportion of water in the substance. There have been stories of some types of cakes, as well as cheeses, being rejected. The only way to know for sure is to try (of course, the results may vary from one airport to another, and from one operator to another).

Of course, if you want to keep the jar, nothing prevents you from dropping the succulent brown goo into the bin while keeping the jar. Have a spatula at hand to assist you with this.

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