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When it rains the lane markings become almost invisible. Even in the daylight it is hard to see, but at night it is much harder.

Would installing a specific color of foglights help? Would it help to use polarized lenses?

closed as primarily opinion-based by Maître Peseur, Gayot Fow, Karlson, SpaceDog, CGCampbell Jul 8 '15 at 2:45

Many good questions generate some degree of opinion based on expert experience, but answers to this question will tend to be almost entirely based on opinions, rather than facts, references, or specific expertise. If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

  • Foglights in the rain would seem overkill and risk dazzling oncoming traffic, no? – CMaster Jul 7 '15 at 8:27
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    At the risk of sounding snarky... don't drive in the rain at night then? – jpatokal Jul 7 '15 at 9:14
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    At the risk of stating the obvious, drive slower. I've driven in snowstorms where you don't see the lanes at all, let alone the edge of the road – blackbird Jul 7 '15 at 13:55
  • I've seen something like this before, but only in some areas, where the paint used for the lane markings seems to be the problem. In other areas I have no problem seeing the markings. And in some areas they are installing reflectors in the road along with the markings. – Michael Hampton Jul 7 '15 at 16:35
  • I'm voting to close this question as off-topic because it's about driving and not travel -- although the dedicated driving SE never got up to speed (ha!) so I'm not sure where else you could ask this. – SpaceDog Jul 8 '15 at 2:32
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There is not much you can do to support seeing lane markings.

I would still visit an eye specialist (especially if you are getting old) because you can have nyctalopia (the inability to see the lane markings on low light is one warning sign) or photophobia, sensitivity to light (the rain causes strong light reflexes which does not allow the eye to see correctly).

It is independent of how good you see at day, your day vision could be completely perfect. Many people do not realize how bad their night vision is because it deteoriates imperceptibly.

  • Are you saying that no one else has this issue? When it isn't raining I can see the marks far ahead. When it rains I can only see the marks that are close. They appear to be the same color as the road just raised. – HaLeiVi Jul 7 '15 at 14:21
  • Unfortunately I have only a crystal ball for knowing if and what is wrong. Heavy rain makes not only lane markings but everything invisible in the distance, so everyone is slowing down. But light drizzle should not impede the visibility of the markings. One possible problem is that your lights are wrongly set and light too deep (Check it). If that is not the case, it seems that the rain reduces contrast very strongly for you. This points to something with your eyes which cause this: nyctalopia (severe contrast under low light conditions), glare sensitivity or e.g. color vision deficiency. – Thorsten S. Jul 8 '15 at 14:12
  • I am talking about heavy rain. I am asking if there are solutions out there for seeing lane markings, such as a specific color light, position of lights, or filtered lens. I can see the side of the road easier than the lane marks ahead. I can see its bevel but obviously only for like 7 feet. The color matches the road when it rains at night. – HaLeiVi Jul 8 '15 at 16:18
  • @HaLeiVi Fortunately it did rain heavily today, but had no car, so I observed the street ducked from the side window through the windshield. If the markings are white and in good condition, they are clearly visible until the viewing range in daylight. If the viewing range is 50 m, they are visible in 50m, if heavy rain impedes vision down to 20 m, the marking are visible to 20m. If you cannot see the markings in daylight in the same distance as you can see other objects, check immediately your eyes. – Thorsten S. Jul 8 '15 at 22:26
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I think better lights are the only real solution, especially if the road lines are unclear. I've always had more difficulty driving at night and try to stick with well-lit roads or streets I'm familiar with.

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