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I am an Indian passport holder and currently visiting Canada. I have a 10 year multiple entry visit visa for Canada and I want to apply for a US visit visa.

Can I apply for a US visa in Canada while I am a visitor in Canada?

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The US does not generally restrict which embassies a person may apply for a nonimmigrant visa from (though there are a couple of exceptions, Canada is not one of them). You can apply for a B-1/B-2 visitor visa from within almost any country you have entered legally.

However, the embassy in Canada strongly recommends you to apply from your country of residence. The reason for this is that they are not experienced in evaluating applications from anyone other than Canadian residents, and your application may be denied because they don't know how to verify your information.

With rare exceptions, visa applicants temporarily visiting Canada should apply at the U.S. Consular Section in their country of residence. If the applicant is not a resident of Canada, interviewing officers at the U.S. Consular Sections in Canada may not have experience in evaluating the circumstances in the applicant's country of residence. The applicant will, therefore, have greater difficulty establishing eligibility for a U.S. visa in Canada than would be experienced in the applicant's home country.

A substantial percentage of visitors to Canada are denied visas under these circumstances. Consequently, we strongly urge visitors to Canada to apply for U.S. visas in their country of residence.

If you're visiting Canada it's also possible that you don't have the necessary documentation with you anyway. It is also possible that you won't be able to obtain an appointment for an interview before you have to leave Canada. You can check wait times for your nearest embassy/consulate to be sure.

If you decide to apply anyway, you will need these documents:

  • Printout of DS-160 Confirmation Page with legible bar code
  • Valid Passport (at least 6 months)
  • Proof of legal status in Canada (original or certified copy)
  • Older passports containing previous visas
  • Documents substantiating previous legal status in U.S.
  • Reciprocity fee (if applicable)
  • Proof of sufficient funds to cover all expenses while in the U.S.
  • Proof of ties/residence in a country outside the U.S. which have no intentions of abandoning
  • Evidence showing purpose of trip.

And you should apply by first filling out the online DS-160 and then scheduling an interview appointment.

  • The links seem to be broken now (spring 2018). Do you know if this guidance is still shown on any government site? – krubo Apr 17 '18 at 15:41
  • @krubo I only see one broken link. AFAIK the guidance is still correct, but I'll find an updated link later. – Michael Hampton Apr 17 '18 at 16:04
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As you have mentioned in your post that you are an Indian passport holder and currently visiting Canada.You can apply for a US visit visa in canada while you are visitor in canada but this process will going to be very complex for you.

While anyone can attempt to get a U.S. visa in Canada, individuals who are visitors to Canada will likely face additional scrutiny of their visa application. If you are not a resident of Canada, officers at the U.S. Consulate in Canada will not be able to verify all the information related to your visa easily.You have to face greater difficulty in establishing eligibility for a U.S visa while living as a visitor in canada than you would in your home country.That's why I would like to recommend all the visitors to canada should apply for U.S visas in their own country.

But for your information following information is required when you are making online request for an appointment:

1.Your passport number.

2.Proof that the U.S. visa application fee has been paid .

3.The bar code number from your Nonimmigrant Visa Electronic Application (Form DS-160).

4.SEVIS ID number (from your I-20 or DS-2019) .

5.Petition Number from your Form I-797 (for H-1B employees) .

6.Case Number for Immigrant Visa applicants

Wishing you all the very best.

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