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I applied for my passport, but have not received it yet, I have to fly to Budapest next Thursday and are back on Sunday. I am flying from Schipol to Budapest. I have geprevligeerde Dutch ID card and my personal ID book.

  • Are you a Dutch citizen? – JoErNanO May 6 '15 at 13:15
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    What's a “geprevligeerde card”? It does even appear to be a proper Dutch word. Do you mean the ID you got from the ministry of Foreign Affairs on the basis of some form of immunity (making you “geprivilegieerd")? What's your citizenship? – Relaxed May 6 '15 at 14:32
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    Thank you for your answers and advise. I from South Africa, but we stay in Den Haag, my husband works at the ICC. – Lizandre Van Rooyen May 6 '15 at 16:52
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    @jwenting not having a proper ID doesn't make one an illegal alien. Besides, for the Dutch identificatieplicht, according to Wikipedia at least, the geprivilegieerdendocument suffices. – phoog May 6 '15 at 19:44
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    @jwenting Given the fact that you have regularly shown that you fail to grasp even the most basic point of the law on visas or immigration, how do you pretend to know all this? – Relaxed May 6 '15 at 20:09
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I don't think you are entitled to travel with just that. For example, the official guidance for law enforcement personnel explains that

De geprivilegieerdenkaart van Buitenlandse Zaken geeft, samen met een geldig reisdocument, de houder het recht het Schengengebied binnen te komen (en daar te reizen).

In English:

The geprivilegieerdenkaart from Foreign Affairs, together with a valid travel document, grants the holder the right to enter the Schengen area (and to travel there).

This means that the geprivilegieerdenkaart basically exempts you from any visa requirement. While it does not explicitly say anything about internal Schengen borders or unambiguously state it's not valid without a passport, it's strongly implied that one is needed. And of course this only covers the Dutch side of things.

Without a valid passport, a European (EU, EEA or Swiss) national ID card would also be enough but a South African ID will most likely not be recognised.

But on the other hand, you should not have to go through any official passport check. If you would travel by road, there would still be a slight risk of encountering some sort of random check but generally speaking you should be able to reach Hungary without problems.

By air, the airline/ground handling personnel will probably want to see some ID but they might not be aware of all the details of the rules and the geprivilegieerdenkaart is in fact a valid form of ID in the Netherlands (although not necessarily in Hungary). So it might just work. But you can't count on it.

  • yes, an RSA ID card (not a passport apparently) would not be a valid travel document for internal travel in the EU. In fact without an RSA passport, as a non-EU citizen, he's already in violation of the law even being in the EU... – jwenting May 6 '15 at 19:00
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    @jwenting that's just not true. Her husband is an employee of an international organization, legally residing and working in the Netherlands under the terms of a diplomatic treaty. The expiration of a passport in that circumstance does not by itself make her persona non grata. – phoog May 6 '15 at 19:47
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    @jwenting My BS alarm just went through the roof. What specific law would the OP be violating? Her status is clear and her geprivilegieerdenkaart is explicitly recognised as a valid ID for the Wet op de Identificatieplicht. – Relaxed May 6 '15 at 20:08
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The Dutch national ID card, can indeed be used as a travel document within the EEA and Switzerland. This is true for various other ID cards released by countries inside the EEA and Switzerland. Since the EEA includes the EU, and Hungary is inside the EU you should be able to fly to Budapest with your Dutch ID card.

  • The card in question is not a Dutch national ID card since OP is not a Dutch national. – phoog Aug 9 '18 at 23:12

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