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I am trying to apply for French Schengen spouse visa as my husband is British. I hold valid Indian passport with valid UK visa. My full name was changed after marriage and I got a new passport issued after it. But now my name on marriage certificate and name on new passport does not match. I have my old passport with name matching with marriage certificate with me but TLScontact people refused to accept my application saying name on my current passport is different from marriage certificate even though my old passport copy was submitted to them. Will I face any issues for getting spouse visa? Does Indian embassy write old name on new passport for reference? How do I tackle this problem?

  • Are you currently living in the UK with your husband? Are you planning to go to France on a short visit, or to settle there permanently? – Henning Makholm Jan 7 '15 at 18:37
  • Yes living in UK with husband and going to France with him for short visit of 4 days. – radha Jan 8 '15 at 11:30
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    Hmm, I was going to suggest you should get the UK authorities (who presumably recognizes your marriage) to issue you a "Residence card of a family member of a Union citizen", pursuant to article 10 of the Freedom of Movement Directive, which would give you a right you to visit Schengen visa-free. However, it looks like the UK is not actually in compliance with the directive and refuses to issue those cards when the union citizen in question is an UK citizen. So I've got nothing ... – Henning Makholm Jan 8 '15 at 12:12
  • Where and how did you change your name? There has to be some sort of a document confirming the name change - this document should then be submitted along with the marriage certificate and the new passport. – Aleks G Jan 10 '15 at 19:03
  • @HenningMakholm, the UK will honour the directive if the primary (the Brit) has exercised treaty rights. But without treaty rights, no chance. – Gayot Fow Jan 14 '15 at 21:06
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TLSContact was wrong. If what they told you was correct, then people who get married in the UK and change their name would be immobile for lack of an identity.

This is a common issue and to handle it, the person submits...

  1. The original passport showing the maiden name;
  2. The marriage certificate showing the maiden name and the spouse's name
  3. The current passport showing the new name.

If TLScontact did not follow this convention, you can still apply either directly or through another agent.

If your husband has exercised treaty rights in the past, you can benefit from the EEA family route and get a residence card. Otherwise you will need to use the Schengen route.

  • Hi Gayot thanks for your reply. In my case I submitted exactly the 3 docs you mentioned above but TLS refused to accept my application, so I booked a direct appointment with french embassy and there they again refused to accept it and asked me to get my maiden name written on my new passport as an observation by Indian embassy. I somehow convinced my embassy do that and also got a marriage certificate from embassy but they still did not accept my spouse visa application stating me that my marriage certificate is not appofilated which means it does not have stamp from Ministry of Foreign affair – radha Jan 21 '15 at 16:41
  • So now I need to go to India and get a stamp from Ministry of foreign affairs to be able to apply for spouse visa. This has been the worst experience of my life so far. The requirement of documents does not make any sense. If UK can grant me a visa then what is problem for French consulate. Why demand such unnecessary documents even though my husband holds a British passport. We also submitted a grievance against the embassy but they did not respond to it and made me apply for a tourist visa even though I am a legitimate spouse. Can I take this matter to a next level? – radha Jan 21 '15 at 16:45
  • @radha, I'm sorry they have put you through this ordeal. It is captious to the extreme and such procedures that you have described simply do not exist. Unfortunately, the EEA does not consider tourism to be a human right and this leaves only the option to complain. Alternatively, you can try a different Schengen member. It's sad that this sort of behaviour exists, but there's barely naught to be done about it. – Gayot Fow Jan 21 '15 at 17:08

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