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So, long time I ago I got this information from a trustworthy source (a Hollywood movie) that a cop car can follow you only until to a state line. If you cross the state line, they have to let you go.

Is this sort of thing still true in America? Or was it perhaps never true in the first place?

closed as off-topic by Nate Eldredge, Gayot Fow, Karlson, choster, Nean Der Thal Dec 16 '14 at 22:00

  • This question does not appear to be about traveling within the scope defined in the help center.
If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

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    How is this about travel? – Nate Eldredge Dec 16 '14 at 17:16
  • Try Skeptics, though I think it would be doubtful even there. – DJClayworth Dec 16 '14 at 17:37
  • It's about traveling by car really really really fast. Irrespective of that it doesn't appear to be a travel question but rather a legal one. But yes this was a thing but had since been changed in most if not all states that a police officer in pursuit can cross state lines, speaking of Hollywood movie reference Smokey and The Bandit – Karlson Dec 16 '14 at 18:20
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    It has never been true in America, or any other common law country, where the principle of fresh pursuit (better known as hot pursuit) applies; moreover, most jurisdictions have agreements with neighboring ones regarding how enforcement activities are shared, and if you are in pursuit, the pursuing law enforcement agency is almost certainly in contact with their counterparts on the other side of the line. – choster Dec 16 '14 at 18:24

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