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Originally I applied for a Schengen visa short stay but my application was refused and now I'm planning to re-apply for a longer visa (6 months) for the same purpose, to study german language. Would there be a problem later on if I apply for a long stay visa?

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    Based upon the comments you have provided to the answers below, it looks like you have been scammed by a travel agent. From your earlier question last week, one of the grounds for your refusal was you didn't establish a premise for your visa, all the other things your agent is telling are window dressings. Opening a German bank account is ridiculous! If they refused a short-term visit, there's no way they will approve a long-term visit. You need to concentrate on your premise. And another agent... – Gayot Fow Nov 17 '14 at 11:34
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Formally, it's not a problem. But even if the rules are not exactly the same, the reasons that led to the rejection of your previous application presumably still apply. You need to weigh that carefully and we certainly can't tell you if it's going to work or not.

  • I dont really want to complicate it further, so I guess I will just continue what I've started its just that, I'm concerned with the duration of the program I registered and I'm just applying for a short stay visa. – Betynka Nov 17 '14 at 10:20
  • @Betynka I am a bit confused by your comments. Just to recap, the rule is very simple: less than 90 days means short-stay (also called type C uniform) Schengen visa, more than 90 days means national “long-stay” visa, no matter the purpose. If your program is longer than 90 days, then the short-stay visa application will be rejected (they will think you are using the program as an excuse and intend to overstay your visa in any case). – Relaxed Nov 17 '14 at 10:57
  • I'm sorry if you're kind of confused but my agent started everything by telling me to apply a short stay visa and if I wanted to further my study of German language I can extend it somehow and my passport now has a refusal stamp of both D and C visa. – Betynka Nov 17 '14 at 12:03
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    @Betynka Unfortunately, I think GayotFow is exactly right: your agent has been lying to you and is trying to scam you. There is no way you could “extend” a short-stay visa in this situation. – Relaxed Nov 17 '14 at 12:36
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Originally I applied for a Schengen visa short stay but my application was refused and now I'm planning to re-apply for a longer visa (6 months) for the same purpose, to study german language.

You did not say why it was rejected (the specific reasons are mentioned in the response), but as a guess I would say that should not have applied for a short stay as your purpose was for education.

So to start off with, make sure you are applying for the right purpose and providing the correct documents.

Also a Schengen visa is limited to 90 days of maximum stay; if you want to stay for longer than that period (as is normally the case for students) you would need to apply for a residence permit which is usually a stamp on your passport once you have entered the country. In this case, you might need to provide additional supporting documents to the embassy.

Above all else - be truthful in your application and ask the counselor at the Embassy what else you need to provide to clarify the purpose of your visit.

Keep in mind they are looking for signs that you are not using this visa as a pretense to migrate, work illegally or seek asylum in the country - and that there are significant ties to bring your back to your home country/domicile.

It was the agency I paid who advised me of the short stay visa, they registered me to a 6 months language course and I paid 3 months tuition fee and my agent told me to apply for a short stay visa.

I don't know why they advised you for a short stay (unless you were planning on coming back between your course).

From my experience, what you need for education:

  1. Letter confirming admission from the institution.
  2. Sufficient insurance for the duration of your stay.
  3. Proof of funds (or other means, for example, scholarship letter) that attest your ability to support yourself during your stay.
  4. They might also ask for proof of accommodation, although sometimes this is not required.

And now my agent was kind of telling me to apply for a long stay and then open a blocked account in a german bank.

The blocking of funds is part of the financial proof required (although it seems a bit odd to have funds blocked in the German bank). This could be a condition of your language course though.

You can ask the agent what was the reason for the rejection as this will help you in your subsequent application.

  • It was the agency I paid who advised me of the short stay visa, they registered me to a 6 months language course and I paid 3 months tuition fee and my agent told me to apply for a short stay visa. – Betynka Nov 17 '14 at 7:15
  • And now my agent was kind of telling me to apply for a long stay and then open a blocked account in a german bank. – Betynka Nov 17 '14 at 7:16
  • (-1) That's simply not true. If the stay is less than three months, then you need a short stay visa, even if the purpose is education (which is a perfectly legitimate purpose for a Schengen visa). Also, that's not 90 days per entry but 90 days per 180-day period. – Relaxed Nov 17 '14 at 7:47
  • The point is that the person was applying for a short stay, when their course is 6 months - at least this is what I understood from their question. – Burhan Khalid Nov 17 '14 at 7:48
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    @Betynka, I would delete this question and open a different question about if you have been scammed and what, if anything, can be done about it. Include your comment above, about waiting for results also. Given all that's been written, this question is either irrelevant or misconceived. – Gayot Fow Nov 17 '14 at 15:09

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