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This event all happened about 5 minutes at 3 PM in Washington. I got a violation ticket for seatbelt when I set in the back set of private car. When we stopped our car and before the officer came, I was trying to find my husband's international driver license, so I unlocked my seatbelt, therefore I also got one ticket. The officer came to front window and asked license and said 'do you know you are overspeed?' Before he came, I set on the middle of backseat, I unbelted in order to find some stuff I need and move closer to the window when the car stopped. But the officer just ask and took our license away. When we cool down I and our mother waved our hand and try to get the officer back, but he just ignored!

closed as unclear what you're asking by Gilles, Tor-Einar Jarnbjo, Mark Mayo, Karlson, choster Sep 17 '14 at 17:17

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    Where did this happen? How long are you staying there? – jpatokal Sep 17 '14 at 5:39
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    I am tempted to vote this down because it is missing very critical information: where did this happen? – Burhan Khalid Sep 17 '14 at 6:39
  • do the crime, do the time (or in this case pay the fine). Just because you're a foreigner doesn't make you immune from being subject to the law. – jwenting Sep 17 '14 at 11:38
  • @jwenting is right. That said, it does sound unreasonable to fine someone for not wearing a seatbelt in car that's standing still. – MastaBaba Sep 17 '14 at 13:30
  • @MastaBaba that would likely not be illegal. Seems to me they noticed she wasn't wearing her seatbelt, and assumed it had been off before the car was stopped. And bloody hard to prove otherwise if it ever goes to court, unless there's video from the trooper car that shows different. – jwenting Sep 17 '14 at 14:06
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Foreigner or not, if you get fined, you are responsible for paying the fine.

However, you can dispute the fine in court if you disagree, eg. in this case you had a pretty good excuse for not having your seatbelt on. The exact procedure, the time and effort needed to do it, and the likelihood of getting the fine waived will vary greatly based on where this happened.

  • The officer came to front window and asked license and said 'do you know you are overspeed?' I set on the middle of backseat.I unbelted in order to find some stuff I need and move closer to the window when the car stopped. But the officer just ask and took our license away. When we cool down I and our mother waved our hand and try to get the officer back, but he just ignored! – Tina Sep 18 '14 at 7:34
  • Why it is depend on where this happens? – Tina Sep 18 '14 at 19:59
  • Because different countries, states have different procedures for contesting traffic violation. Your ticket will probably have text on it that says: To pay: do this. To contest: do this. – Ida Sep 18 '14 at 22:25
  • My ticket only got three choice: pay the fine; mitigation hearing; contested hearing. I choice contested hearing, they will send me a court date, I will be there. But I do not understand the word " NOTICE: You may be able to enter into a payment plan with the court under RCW 46.63.110." Could someone interpret it for me? – Tina Sep 19 '14 at 5:16
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    That means you can pay the fine in parts if you cannot afford to pay it at once. – jpatokal Sep 19 '14 at 5:36

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