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My partner is a UK citizen and I'm a Dutch citizen but we both live in Australia. I'm wondering if the 90/180 Schengen rules apply to us if we are planning on visiting multiple EU countries for more than 90 days, but not more than 90 days in one country. How do they know we haven't been in one country more than 90 days when we eventually leave to return to Australia? We have a registered partnership in Australia if that makes any difference. Thanks!

2 Answers 2

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I'm wondering if the 90/180 schengen rules apply to us if we are planning on visiting multiple eu countries for more than 90 days but not more than 90 days in one country

No, they don't

As a EU national family member, your partner inherits the same EU freedom of movement rights as you, when traveling with or joining you.

How do they know we haven't been in one country more than 90 days when we eventually leave to return to Australia?

Traveling with the EU national will remove any of that kind of questioning

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    It's worth noting that not everyone you come across may be aware of the status of non-EU partners of EU nationals. Generally IME, customs/boarder officials are on it, but often airline representatives aren't as familiar with it and you may face some delays (e.g. have had a few supervisors called before we could check-in, board plan etc when the airline were doing their own checks), but no real problems other than that. Mar 8 at 13:56
  • does Australian registered partnership count as family member from the perspective of the EU?
    – njzk2
    Mar 8 at 19:07
  • @njzk2 - EU countries which have their own civil partnerships or same-sex marriages will generally recognise the equivalent from Australia or elsewhere, but that is not necessarily the case in those EU countries which do not.
    – Henry
    Mar 8 at 19:51
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For most visitors, the 90/180 rule applies to the whole Schengen area, not individual counties; your passport will be stamped on entry to Schengen and only stamped again when you leave, at which point they can compare the dates.

To claim the benefit of being an EU national family member, your partner will need to carry evidence of the relationship such as a certificate of registered partnership and either accompany you or join you.

It might also be worth being aware that some EU countries do not recognise registered partnerships: this page from the EU itself currently lists Bulgaria, Latvia, Lithuania, Poland, Romania, and Slovakia. This should only be issue if you plan to stay in one of them for an extended period, but you might find life easier if your entry and departure from the Schengen area involves other countries.

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