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Why would an American power strip trip the fuse 100% of the time on an Indian power outlet with the proper adapter?

I know the adapter works with the individual devices so the cause is the power strip, is an additional adapter required to prevent a power strip from tripping the breaker?

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    Perhaps the adapter is not so proper?
    – Jon Custer
    Jan 24 at 18:13
  • @JonCuster the adapter is known to work because if I plug it directly into the individual devices it won’t trip the fuse. So the cause is the power strip and I tried two completely different brands. I just don’t understand how or why if it’s pulling 0 watts in America when plugged in to the wall.
    – CodeCamper
    Jan 24 at 18:15
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    This really belongs on electronics.stackexchange.com not here!
    – Doc
    Jan 24 at 20:17

1 Answer 1

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India has high line voltage: Nominally it's either 230V or 240V depending on the state but there is also a fair amount of variability, so you can easily 250V or even 260V at an outlet.

A US power strip is designed for 110V and will probably have an over voltage protection.

with the proper adapter?

Depends on the type of adapter. In this case you should really use a 2:1 step down transformer (which tend to be big and heavy). A simple socket adapter will not work here.

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    Or to state this otherwise: a plug adapter is not a power transformer. If the power strip doesn't say something like AC 100-240V~50/60Hz, then it can't deal with the extra 130V. Jan 24 at 21:38
  • @MarkJohnson but why would this cause the indian power breaker to trip and not the power strips safety switch?
    – CodeCamper
    Feb 2 at 10:06
  • but why would this cause the indian power breaker to trip and not the power strips safety switch?
    – CodeCamper
    Feb 2 at 10:06
  • @CodeCamper Because it sends the extra 130V (that it cannot handel) back to the system it came from. I have seen this happen in Europe, where the 110/240V power switch of a PC was on the outside (instead of hidden inside as is more common) and while the PC was on was switched to 110V. That not only fried the PC, with a dark, atom bomb like, cloud arising, but also blew the fuse of the room. Feb 2 at 10:33
  • @MarkJohnson what is the proper adapter needed to resolve this situation?
    – CodeCamper
    Feb 7 at 5:23

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