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I've got this reason in my visa refusal: "Based on the applicant's immigration status outside their country of nationality or habitual residence, I am not satisfied that they will leave Canada".
I live in this country - where I applied - for more than 6 years and have a status of permanent resident here. But it seems that, somehow, they decided that it's not my "country of habitual residence". And this makes me wonder, how can this be? How is it determined?

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    For completeness, what’s your citizenship? ‘Habitual residence’ means what it says: the pIace where your life is mainly based. I don’t think it means they decided the country where you applied from and have PR status is not your habitual residence but rather, that your current immigration status there is insufficient. It seems likely to me that they want you to be a citizen of that country, and not just a PR, before they grant the tourist visa. See similar question travel.stackexchange.com/questions/179942/…
    – Traveller
    Commented Jun 8, 2023 at 0:19
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    @ChrisH I’m not saying that. I’m saying that it’s possible that the OP’s refusal is for the same reason as in this question travel.stackexchange.com/questions/179942/… That is, an application from a citizen of a country considered ‘high risk’ who is not living in that country. But as the OP doesn’t mention their citizenship, it’s just an observation. chat.stackexchange.com/rooms/144519/…
    – Traveller
    Commented Jun 8, 2023 at 8:54
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    "I've got this reason in my visa refusal...": Is that the only reason mentioned?
    – phoog
    Commented Jun 8, 2023 at 11:02
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    I think we probably need a new post with the whole thing (filling in the blanks of "this is my citizenship, and this is my residence, and my status; I applied for this visa for this reason; I got this refusal; why?") rather than trying to focus specifically on terminology*
    – AakashM
    Commented Jun 8, 2023 at 12:17
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    Asterea, whether the applicant's immigration status outside the country of nationality or habitual residence serves as a basis to conclude that there is a risk of the applicant remaining in Canada is also purely subjective. Regarding your comment to @Traveller, visa refusals certainly often cite reasons that could be pretextual or are even likely to be. I don't know if that's the case with Canada but since they seem to use a standard set of generic reasons it probably is. Still, considering the whole picture is more likely to shed light on your refusal than focusing on a single reason.
    – phoog
    Commented Jun 9, 2023 at 8:30

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This appears to be a standard phrase. What could it mean?

Based on the applicant's immigration status outside their country of nationality or habitual residence, I am not satisfied that they will leave Canada.

Your question implies that you are assuming that they have decided that the country where you live is not your country of habitual residence, and that if you can convince them that it is perhaps this will negate this reason as a basis for refusal. It's possible that you're right about this.

I suspect, however, that this phrase is used because of its significance in the refugee convention, where the "habitual residence" part applies only to stateless people. For example, one of the elements of the definition of "refugee" under the convention is

is outside the country of his nationality and is unable or, owing to such fear, is unwilling to avail himself of the protection of that country; or who, not having a nationality and being outside the country of his former habitual residence as a result of such events, is unable or, owing to such fear, is unwilling to return to it.

If this is true, then the fact that you have a country of nationality means that your place of habitual residence is irrelevant, and the reason reduces to

Based on the applicant's immigration status outside their country of nationality, I am not satisfied that they will leave Canada.

Now it's anyone's guess why your status as a permanent resident of whatever country it is would lead to a visa officer being "not satisfied" that you would leave Canada. If you want to let us know what the countries are, it might help to clarify.

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