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I had to book a flight where there is no directly flight from my departure airport and destination. Usually in these cases, I try make sure all parts of the trip use the same airline. This has always had two advantages: (1) I can have more luggage on the domestic part of the flight and (2) if my first flight has a delay, the airline will still make sure I get to my destination one way or another.

This time, though, I wasn't able to find a single airline that had my route. I first have a domestic US flight, with American Airlines, then two international flights with Cathay Pacific. Though this is with multiple airlines, I bought them as a single purchase, direct from the Cathay Pacific Web site, didn't use a third party like Expedia, and didn't need to buy the AA tickets separately.

My question is, with the flights being run by different airlines, did I give up protection from delayed flights and the right to bring more luggage on the domestic parts of the trip?

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with the flights being run by different airlines, did I give up protection from delayed flights

No. It's a single booking with Cathay and the have the responsibility to get you to your final destination.

and the right to bring more luggage on the domestic parts of the trip?

That should be spelled in the terms and conditions of your ticket. Typically the checked baggage allowance is the same for all legs of the flight. Carry-on size and weight can vary between carriers, but chances are that Cathay is more restrictive than American anyway.

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    +1, but international flights to/from the US usually (always?) use the "piece concept" for baggage, not the usual kilogram limits you'd get on Cathay. Jun 7, 2023 at 10:00

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