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A person had Indian Passport, & was travelling from USA to India on route New York > Paris > Amsterdam > Delhi. He did not know that he needs Schengen Visa for Paris to Amsterdam. Was held when landed in Paris & tried to go catch flight for AMS, for few hours (fingerprinted, photos etc); & then deported to India. He has since then (4 years) avoided any connecting flights through whole Europe & England.

Now he has American Passport. Does his past deportation stops him from getting Visa on Arrival access to Schengen? Can & should he apply tourist visa as per Schengen Visa Policy?

Now if he lands in Paris from New York for tourism as Visa on Arrival (& has all hotel bookings, & required stuff), he if & when asked, will answer correctly about deportation. What would be the outcome at border?

Edit: Here is the stamp he got:

enter image description here

Schengen Border Code ANNEX V Part B says (c) means No Visa

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    This sounds more like a refused entry after attemting to enter the Schengen Area by leaving the airport. Posting a picture of the stamps in the passport would be helpful to carify. See schengen - Have I been deported from Germany? Can l apply for study Visa in UK - Travel Stack Exchange for a sample of a refused entry stamp. Dec 17, 2022 at 6:36
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    Technically, US citizens would not get a visa on arrival for a tourist visit, since the US is on Annex II and they do not need a visa. Getting a visa would only be appropriate for stays over 90 days.
    – o.m.
    Dec 17, 2022 at 6:56
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    US citizens do not require a visa for the Schengen Area and will recieve an entry stamp on arrival. (They do not recieve a 'Visa on Arrival', which is a term used in other countries). A refused entry does not cause a ban (a deportation does). If the previous visit was a refused entry, then there will be no problem. Dec 17, 2022 at 6:56
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    @DavChana In any case, your question can't be anwered with certainty. US citizens don't need a visa to enter the Schengen Area and have a high probability of being admitted, but it's never guaranteed. Booked accomodation and a return flight will definitely help. If asked, he should answer all questions regarding his previous travels to the Schengen Area truthfully, of course. Dec 19, 2022 at 8:51
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    Reason 'C' (shown in the refused entry stamp) means on that the reason was: 'has no valid visa or residence permit' (see list found in the Schengen Border Code ANNEX V Part B). The avoided any connecting flights through whole Europe & England was not required at all. With the Indian passport a normal visa could have been applied for that that would have allowed a domestic Schengen flight (or a normal visit). With a US passport your friend should have no problem at all since this was not a deportation. Dec 21, 2022 at 0:20

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Reason 'C' (shown in the refused entry stamp) means: 'has no valid visa or residence permit'

Does his past deportation stops him from getting Visa on Arrival access to Schengen? Can & should he apply tourist visa as per Schengen Visa Policy?

Your friend was not deported.

See schengen - Have I been deported from Germany? Can l apply for study Visa in UK - Travel Stack Exchange for a sample of a deportation stamp (from Germany) that will also have an exit stamp next to it.

He has since then (4 years) avoided any connecting flights through whole Europe & England.

This was not required at all.

With the Indian passport a normal visa could have been applied for that that would have allowed a domestic Schengen flight (or a normal visit).

Now he has American Passport.
...
(fingerprinted, photos etc);
...
What would be the outcome at border?

With a US passport (for which no visa is required) your friend should have no problem at all since this was not a deportation.

When the Entry/Exit System (EES) is fully in place, it is very likely that the previous event will be noticed since the biometric data (fingerprints and captured facial images) was taken.

As long as the entry conditions are fulfilled, this should have no effect on any future entry.

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You were refused entry for not having an appropriate visa or residence permit (letter C on the standard refusal of entry form). You should have also received the standard entry refusal form.

France does not usually issue entry bans for not having sufficient documents. French law provides several grounds for denying entries due to previous administrative or judicial decisions:

  • a judicial ban from the territory: for serious crimes pronounced by a criminal court judge, not applicable if you did not get a court order, and not having sufficient document is not a crime punishable by judicial ban
  • a deportation order: against persons who are illegal in France for exceptional serious reasons (public safety or national security threat), not applicable to you since you did not enter France
  • a ban on returning to French territory: for persons required to leave France (you did not enter France), not applicable in any case since the maximum length is three years
  • a ban on movement on French territory: against European citizens with right of free movement, not applicable to you
  • an administrative ban from the territory: the only thing that is possible for you, although very unlikely since an administrative ban can only be issued for serious threats to public order

In all cases, if you did receive a ban, a written decision must be communicated to you. Given the situation you described and assuming you did not received additional documents, you are unlikely to have been banned by France.

Depending on your risk appetite, to be very certain, you can also request your personal information from the French border guards and the Schengen Information system. But information requests from abroad may be complicated and take a long time which may interfere your travel plans.

Of course, no one can guarantee that you will be allowed to enter, that is the border guard's decision on the day. But if France did not place a ban on you, there is no ground to refuse you just because you were denied entry previously; and in practice, an American passport usually gets few if any questions.

That said, you should be prepared that you may encounter more scrutiny due to previous refusal of entry. So you should judiciously prepare the required documents and proofs of intention and fund (e.g. hotel bookings, return tickets, the mandatory travel insurance conforming to Schengen requirements, bank statements).


As a relatively minor point, Schengen does not practice visas on arrival in general (qualified family members of EU citizens excepted). You either require or do not require a visa depending on your nationality on the travel document.

There is a project to implement a predeparture electronic authorization system (ETIAS) in the near future (despite repeated delays). If it is implemented and enters into force, as a visa-free national, you will need to apply for the electronic authorization ahead of your travel.

Perhaps as an assurance to you, in principle ETIAS should already check if your name is in the list of persons affected by an alert in the Schengen information system.

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  • Thanks a lot for comprehensive answer. I appreciate the effort:)
    – DavChana
    Dec 21, 2022 at 15:34
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I presume that stamp was in the Indian passport for the first problem trip. On the next trip, he should show the US passport, which does not require a visa for ninety days in Schengen. So no one will see the stamp in the Indian passport. (But as the other answer seems to say, it wouldn't matter if they did.)

Even if the computerized system had been running for the first trip, they would not (probably) be able to recognize that the two different passports were for the same person.

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    With the Entry/Exit System (EES), it is very likely that the previous event would have been noticed since the biometric data (fingerprints and captured facial images) was taken. As long as the entry conditions are fulfilled, this should have no effect on any future entry. Dec 21, 2022 at 0:34
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    Biometrics, Name, date of birth, place of birth. What else needed to link to the old passport? Lying and pretending to a new person is a sure way to a ban. The existing offense is very minor and honest mistake compared to deliberate lying to an immigration official. Dec 21, 2022 at 2:19
  • They're not "pretending to be a new person" by merely presenting the passport. Biometrics, maybe; I don't know about India. My current US passport has them, but the one that just expired did not. I don't know anything about "EES" but in this very group many people have said the recent IIS2 does and the previous one did not.
    – WGroleau
    Dec 21, 2022 at 3:19
  • Having a Biometric passport for Visa Waiver Program (VWP) has been a requirement since 2016-04-01. US visas contain the biometric information since 2002. Dec 21, 2022 at 6:10
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    It says from New York. Dec 21, 2022 at 6:20

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