1

Context: My wife and I (both working Indian citizens) are planning to visit the Schengen area (France) as tourists. Both of us individually have all the financial and employment related documents needed for the visa.

When applying for the Schengen visa, there is a requirement for Employment Evidence documents. I am not clear about the purpose of these documents.

Consider this scenario: Instead of both of us showing separate financial proofs, I want to become her financial sponsor for the trip (we are going together anyways, and will be applying for the visa as a group). This is so that we can reduce redundant paperwork.

  • In this case, do I still need to submit my wife's Employment Evidence documents such as pay slips and Income tax returns?
  • What would happen if (even though she is employed) we showed in the application that my wife is not employed and will be sponsored by me? (Again, this is in the interest of reducing redundant paperwork. I will of course provide all my employment paperwork)
1
  • 2
    This sounds like a recipe for a refusal to me, and a risk not worth taking just to save on some (not very onerous) paperwork. You would be building a lie from the start, and that has a tendency to rebound - if not now, in a future application.
    – Traveller
    Jul 13, 2022 at 16:58

3 Answers 3

5

When applying for the Schengen visa, there is a requirement for Employment Evidence documents. I am not clear about the purpose of these documents.

The main consideration for the consulate is whether you will return to your country of residence at the end of your trip or try stay in the Schengen area without a proper long-stay visa. The better your situation where you live, the less of a risk you are from the perspective of the destination country. Consulates demand some minimum documentation to be able to evaluate that.

In this case, do I still need to submit my wife's Employment Evidence documents such as pay slips and Income tax returns?

I would recommend it. They make your case stronger and you don't want to create confusion or ambiguity regarding your wife's situation. Submitting nothing, submitting records of a joint bank account while failling to account for part of the income, or submitting only your data as if it was the only income for the family all run the risk of seeming deceptive if the consulate learns that your wife is working.

Also, failing to submit a document that's explicitely required makes it really easy for the consular officer to refuse the visa (check a box, no thinking or justification needed, case closed). You don't want that.

What would happen if (even though she is employed) we showed in the application that my wife is not employed and will be sponsored by me? (Again, this is in the interest of reducing redundant paperwork. I will of course provide all my employment paperwork)

What do you mean by “showed in the application that my wife is not employed”. Affirm that she is not employed or merely fail to properly document her employment? Deception is a very bad idea and the reason why I think submitted a complete documentation is the best course of action. Do not ever state that your wife isn't employed if she actually is.

On the other hand, if you live together, your wife not having a job might not matter too much. It is not unusual for a married couple to have only one income so it might not raise eyebrows and wouldn't in itself doom your application. So she could still get a visa based only on evidence of your employment.

But if there is anything unusual in your application, for example if you wife does not live with you, it could easily lead to a refusal (it would look like you are separated and she is a huge risk). I have personnally seen refusals for French or Belgian visas in such situations.

In short, what I would recommend is submitting the whole package (and possibly a cover letter) for both of your applications to show that you are a family with an established situation and show yourself in the best possible financial light.

7
  • Thank you for your inputs! My assumption was that by sponsoring my wife, her employment situation becomes irrelevant since I'll be taking care of the finances. But that seems a very narrow way to look at it. Unfortunately, I have already submitted the documents by wrongly stating that she is not employed in the visa application form. I have learnt my lesson - never try to deceive. In the case of rejection, what would be my best bet to appeal this? Can I say that I mistakenly showed my wife as not working and provide her documents as well? Would that work?
    – aksh1t
    Jul 14, 2022 at 7:03
  • Or can I apply for the visa from another Schengen country (in my case Portugal) where I also plan to stay in the trip?
    – aksh1t
    Jul 14, 2022 at 7:05
  • 3
    @aksh1t Applying from another country will also look bad. The first refusal is recorded in a database shared between Schengen countries and the rules are designed to prevent visa shopping (I don't know the specifics of the trip but you cannot pick and chose, if France is really the main destination then Portugal is supposed to refuse to entertain the application and that's even if you don't have a refusal on your record). An appeal is also hopeless, see travel.stackexchange.com/questions/46509/…
    – Relaxed
    Jul 14, 2022 at 21:52
  • 3
    At this stage, I recommend two things: First wait, you might get lucky. Then, if you get a refusal, the only realistic course of action is to apply again. It might be best to just wait a few months and make sure your next application is perfect. That would not salvage this trip but it's your best shot at rebuilding credibility and preserving future trip to the Schengen area and elsewhere.
    – Relaxed
    Jul 14, 2022 at 21:58
  • 1
    If you really want to try to get a visa now then a new application is still the only choice. You have no basis for an appeal and no chance of success, let alone a quick one. By applying to the French consulate again, with more documentation, you are at least showing that you are not trying to go around them but of course your history would not help this application. Not sure whether addressing the issue directly (say in a letter) would be useful for subsequent applications but trying to circumvent a refusal for that trip would risk making matters even worse.
    – Relaxed
    Jul 14, 2022 at 22:02
3

"I am not clear about the purpose of these documents."

The purpose is both regarding financial capability and ties to the home country. So even if you are the financial sponsor, showing her employment strengthens her ties to the home country in the eyes of the visa officer.

No one can tell you what happens. Applications are processed looking at the totality of your circumstances as per the submitted application. No paper is "redundant" as you stated.

The best policy is not to lie and follow the document checklist as per given on the website.

Again nothing can be said by anyone here unless they have access to everything which the visa officer has, that is your complete application and whatever databases they have access to. So isolated information is not of much help.

Just make your application as per asked. Submit the documents as asked and as per reality. If she is employed, you should submit the employment documents, if you are sponsoring her expenses, you should mention that and submit the proof. Her being employed and you sponsoring her expenses are not mutually exclusive but totally separate things.

3
  • Thank you for your inputs! I've actually applied (and successfully got) schengen visa multiple times in the past (and so has my wife), but this was the first time we are going together and applying for a visa as a group (of 2). So, I got carried away in the wrong assumption that I should try to avoid redundant documents - and thought a white lie might be okay. I've learnt my lesson now - never again!
    – aksh1t
    Jul 14, 2022 at 7:08
  • 1
    It's not just a white lie. You are purposefully erasing your wife's significance as an equally contributing member of your household.
    – user79729
    Jul 14, 2022 at 12:06
  • Deliberately providing false information is not a white lie. It’s deception.
    – Traveller
    Jul 15, 2022 at 6:33
2

The number one rule for any visa application should be tell the truth. It doesn't really matter which country you are applying to it is always a bad idea. Providing misleading information is a reason to refuse any visa application. In the unfortunate circumstances where a visa is to be refused, it is better to have a visa refused because the bank account did not have enough funds than through providing false information. Relatively speaking it would be easy to successfully overcome a refusal for financial evidence than it will be for providing false information.

Considering your circumstances this is a completely unnecessary risk which could have serious implications for this application, future Schengen applications and also future applications to other countries outside of the Schengen area... who may also ask about previous visa rejections or previously seeking visa issuance through false or misleading documents.

That said, I hope you follow the correct process and get your visas :)

1
  • 1
    I understand, I really do - this was really bad judgement on my part. This is definitely not going to be repeated.
    – aksh1t
    Jul 19, 2022 at 11:13

You must log in to answer this question.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged .