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I want to spend 2 months in X. I don't want to spend more than a few days in other Schengen countries.

X is not open to touristic Schengen visa applications. X is open to vaccinated tourists with a valid visa flying from non-risky countries.

Germany, Netherlands, Greece and a few other Schengen countries are open to touristic Schengen visa applications.

So, if I get a Schengen multi entry tourist visa from say Netherlands, spend a few days there and then stay in X for 2 months, would that violate the visa rules? Is this ok?

How should I arrange my flight/hotel bookings and what should I say about my plans to embassy?

Side question. If that violates the visa rules, then what happens when people change their mind about their travel plans? Say I planned to stay in Y for 2 months, I go there but don't like the vibe so I leave early. I visit Z and love the place and decide to stay for 2 months in Z. So if I get the Schengen visa for Y, am I CHAINED to my plan of making Y my main country of interest relevant to the visa (the country I spend most time in)??

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    Are you sure you can actually travel to those countries? What is your nationality and residence? Sep 18 at 8:06
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So, if I get a Schengen multi entry tourist visa from say Netherlands, spend a few days there and then stay in X for 2 months, would that violate the visa rules? Is this ok?

Yes, that would violate the rules. According to the EU Visa Code, you must apply for your visa from

the Member State whose territory constitutes the main destination of the visit(s) in terms of the length of stay, counted in days, or the purpose of stay

There are cases where you might be able to make a reasonable argument for multiple countries as the main destination (a 4 day conference in one country then a 5 day holiday in another? You could probably claim either is the main destination). But there’s no ambiguity when you intend to go to one country for a few days and somewhere else for 2 months.

There’s also a clause about when no main destination can be determined, but that doesn’t apply to you.

How should I arrange my flight/hotel bookings and what should I say about my plans to embassy?

This doesn’t apply, as you can’t make the application that way anyway.

Side question. If that violates the visa rules, then what happens when people change their mind about their travel plans? Say I planned to stay in Y for 2 months, I go there but don't like the vibe so I leave early. I visit Z and love the place and decide to stay for 2 months in Z. So if I get the Schengen visa for Y, am I CHAINED to my plan of making Y my main country of interest relevant to the visa (the country I spend most time in)??

You’re not being very subtle. I strongly advise against making a visa application under false pretences. If discovered, it could have serious consequences for your ability to obtain visas in future.

For the record, a genuine change of plans is fine. Plans are plans, they are not set in stone. If 3 days in France and a week in Germany becomes 3 days in France, 2 in Switzerland, then 5 in Germany nobody will bat an eyelid.

If two months in the Netherlands becomes 3 days in NL and 7.5 weeks in Portugal, that’s rather a different matter. If it comes to the attention of the authorities (how likely that is, I can’t say), you can expect to be treated with suspicion. Frankly, I doubt “I didn’t like the vibe” would suffice as an explanation.

the question you didn’t ask but should have: I want to visit Country X as a tourist. I need a visa, but they currently aren’t accepting tourist visa applications. What should I do?

Wait until they start accepting tourist visa applications again.

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    You’ll be able to leave just fine. As I said, a genuine change of plans is just fine. If you do something similar to what you put on the form, you’ll have no trouble. But if what you put on the form makes country A your main destination, then you leave almost immediately and spend 2 whole months in country B, that will take much more explaining. And given the lack of subtlety in your “side question”, you may struggle to provide a convincing explanation. They’ll still happily let you leave, it’s ever coming back that might be tricky.
    – Chris H
    Sep 18 at 12:18
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    And no, an expectation of honesty is not slavery. Stop being ridiculous. You may not like the rules. You may think they’re unfair. You may even be right. That doesn’t make them not the rules, though.
    – Chris H
    Sep 18 at 12:23
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    @user123023 yes, you certainly can leave without breaking any visa rules - you can curtail your visit and exit the EU, no ones stopping you. But what you cant do is game the visa system - you end up losing hard that way.
    – Moo
    Sep 18 at 12:23
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    Because your trip doesn’t even vaguely resemble what you claimed to have planned, and it just so happens that you wouldn’t have been able to get a visa at all if you’d written the trip you actually made on the form. Do you not see how that might arouse suspicion?
    – Chris H
    Sep 18 at 12:26
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    Whether a specific use of a visa is allowed or no hinges on your intentions. What is forbidden is not changing your plans but misrepresenting your plans when you apply. Of course, border guards cannot know for sure whether you were lying all along to circumvent the rules or whether you genuinely didn't like the vibe so they will have to make a guess based on other factors. And can you blame them for not trusting everything you say when you just admitted to us you were in fact considering obtaining a visa frandulently?
    – Relaxed
    Sep 18 at 14:11

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