0

What does it mean when I see this in TIMATIC?

VISA REQUIRED, EXCEPT FOR PASSENGERS WITH A CONFIRMED ONWARD TICKET FOR A FLIGHT TO A THIRD COUNTRY WITHIN 24 HOURS. THEY MUST STAY IN THE INTERNATIONAL TRANSIT AREA OF THE AIRPORT AND HAVE DOCUMENTS REQUIRED FOR THE NEXT DESTINATION.

Must the confirmed onward ticket be with the same PNR, and/or the same airline?

If we issue two separate tickets with different PNRs, and the connection flights is within 24 hours, do the travellers still require a transit visa?

1
  • 3
    As explained by Hilmar, it depends a lot, so to get a more specific answer, you would need to specify the citizenship and place of residence of the passengers, any visas they have, the airports involved (origin, transit and destination), the airlines involved, and whether they have checked luggage or not.
    – jcaron
    Jul 17 at 17:03
3

If we issue two separate tickets with different PNRs, and the connection flights is within 24 hours, do the travellers still require a transit visa?

That depends a lot on the details. Two different PNRs can be tricky. The troublesome part here is

THEY MUST STAY IN THE INTERNATIONAL TRANSIT AREA OF THE AIRPORT

With two different PNRs you need to collect your luggage, go to the check in counter of the second flight and get a boarding pass and drop of your bags, and re-enter the secure area. That means you are NOT staying in the international area. In many airports you can't get back from the baggage claim to the secure area and you often also have to pass through customs and immigration along the way. Some airports don't even HAVE an "international area" (mostly in the US and Canada).

Without checked luggage things are a bit easier. If you can check in online or at a customer service desk, you can get a boarding pass of your second flight without having to leave the transit area. However, whether you can get to your departing gate staying inside the transit area depends a lot on the layout of the specific airport and the terminals/gate.

There is also a good chance that you will be refused at check in for your first flight. Let's say you are flying from A to B to C. At airport A the check in staff needs to verify that you are legally able to enter country B since that's the end of your journey as far as they are concerned. They may not accept your onward ticket and they may not be able to verify whether you can enter country C if they don't fly there. If they deliver you to B and you are not admitted or sent back, the airline risks a heavy fine, so they tend to be conservative.

With two PNRs I strongly recommend getting a transit visa. It's not impossible to do without, but it requires careful research, many conditions must be met and you need to validate this with the first airline before check in.

2
  • It’s worth noting that online check-in is not always possible le even for airlines which usually support it, especially nowadays with COVID-related checks, or for passengers having visa requirements…
    – jcaron
    Jul 17 at 17:07
  • "Some airports don't even HAVE an "international area" (mostly in the US and Canada)": the TIMATIC records for those countries also don't include language like "must stay in the international transit area of the airport."
    – phoog
    Jul 18 at 18:54

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.