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I'm trying to help out a stranded traveler in this thread. British Airways (one-leg) flight cancelled due to Covid

They flew to Delhi with BA but the return was cancelled due to Covid. I'm trying to find out what specific rules apply here. I wasn't able to find anything that covers the specific case where the cancellation happens AFTER the itinerary has already been started. Everything I found on "cancellation" seems to assume that the cancellation happens BEFORE the outbound flight which either results in a rebooking or a full refund.

I would assume that the airline is required to bring you back, but that can be expensive for them if they have to rebook you on a different (non code-share) airline, so they will drag their feet. For a partially flown itinerary, refund is very difficult since it requires pricing out the individual legs.

Specific questions:

  1. What are the passenger rights ? If location is relevant, lets assume governed under EU law. What specific laws apply?
  2. Is there a time limit on how much later (then the original return) the airline can rebook you, regardless of how expensive for them it is? In this example it seems to be 4 or 5 days later.
  3. Can the customer instead ask for a partial refund and how would that have to be calculated?

Any other tips & tricks would be appreciated.

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    Note that this page says that "The outbound and return flights are always considered as two separate flights even if they were booked as part of one reservation." So I suspect that such a person is due either a refund for the unused portion of their ticket or a re-booking to the final destination of the return leg. – Michael Seifert Jan 1 at 14:29
  • Not sure about what rights the passenger has, but BA will refund the cost of the return leg to the passenger. I had a phone call with them in November asking them about solutions should this exact thing happen and they recommended I fly the onward leg and then take the refund of the return leg (given there are no rebooking options provided by BA) and just book a flight by a carrier allowed under the air bubble agreement with the destination country. – Bhushan Kale Jan 2 at 16:31

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