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I'm currently in the US and need to travel to China for work purposes. The Chinese currently require the following:

  1. Passengers bound for China via connecting flights must take nucleic acid and IgM anti-body tests in the U.S. within 48 hours before boarding, and then take both tests a second time in their last transit country within 48 hours before boarding the plane to China. Passengers must apply from the Chinese Embassies/Consulates in BOTH countries (the U.S. and the last transit country) for green health codes with the "HS" mark or certified health declaration forms with their certificates of negative results of both tests.

(from http://www.china-embassy.org/eng/notices/t1828184.htm)

Non-stop flights from the US are very limited, but there are seats on a flight from Vancouver. Will I be permitted to enter Canada, quarantine in a hotel for 48 hours awaiting a result and then fly out of Canada?

The Canada website says:

Foreign nationals seeking to travel to Canada from the United States while the travel restrictions are in place need to satisfy government officials that

I can't find any resource to suggest if my travel would be considered 'non-optional' or 'non-discretionary'.

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    Are you a Canadian Citizen or Permanent Resident or a direct family member of one? – nikhil Nov 10 '20 at 18:23
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    Air Canada says transit through Canada from any location is permitted (without limitation on purpose). This Canadian government page says transiting passengers that stay in the secure area of airport are exempt from travel restrictions, though the section says it's for people coming from outside the US. – user102008 Nov 10 '20 at 18:52
  • @JonathanReez: The OP's first quote seems to say that China requires a test in the last transit country. – user102008 Nov 10 '20 at 18:53
  • @Spaig87 What would you do if the test result was positive? – Traveller Nov 11 '20 at 9:21
  • Not sure if it was deliberate, but the OICs that bans foreign nationals only provide an exemption to transit passengers (within sterile area) from outside of USA. For US-inbound passengers, only possibly applicable exemption provided is transit for a non-discretionary purpose (e.g. driving to Alaska, or going to SPM). – zhantongz Nov 11 '20 at 13:08
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Unless you're a Canadian citizen, permanent resident or a resident visa holder, the answer is no. As per IATA's special COVID page:

Published 02.11.2020

  1. Passengers are not allowed to enter until 30 November 2020. -This does not apply to:
  • nationals of Canada;
  • permanent residents of Canada;
  • passengers arriving from the USA traveling for a purpose other than tourism;
  • immediate family members of a national or a permanent resident of Canada. They must be traveling to be with the national or the permanent resident, and intending to stay in Canada for a period of at least 15 days;
  • extended family members of a national or a permanent resident of Canada. They must be traveling to be with the national or the permanent resident, and intending to stay in Canada for a period of at least 15 days. They must have a statutory declaration signed by the Canadian national attesting to the relationship and a letter issued by IRCC authorizing travel;
  • passengers who do not need to obtain a temporary resident visa and their immediate family members. They must be traveling for a purpose other than tourism;
  • nationals of France who reside in Saint-Pierre-et-Miquelon and have been only in Saint-Pierre-et-Miquelon, the USA or Canada in the past 14 days. They must be traveling for a purpose other than tourism;
  • Indians under the Indian Act;
  • merchant seamen
  • students with a study permit or a written approval notice.

So your best bet is to either pay for a business class ticket or wait for an economy ticket to become available from the US.

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  • I'm not sure this answers the question - your quote says that the restriction does not apply to 'passengers arriving from the USA traveling for a purpose other than tourism;' That said, getting business from the USA is my preferred option although even those flights are limited. – Spaig87 Nov 10 '20 at 21:58
  • @Spaig87 "other than tourism" means you're arriving for work or business purposes, which you will not be. – JonathanReez Nov 10 '20 at 22:09
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    I'm traveling to China on Business. By extension, I would either be considered 'in transit' in Canada, or traveling for Business. I'm not sure if that meets the threshold of 'non-optional' or 'non-discretionary' in the quote in my question though. – Spaig87 Nov 10 '20 at 22:19
  • @Spaig87 it does not. Your travel is still discretionary as far is Canada is concerned. You will not be allowed to enter. – JonathanReez Nov 10 '20 at 22:23
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    It makes for a funny situation: "which business takes you to Canada? I wish to quarantine here." But yes, Canada will probably not find that funny, and reasonably so: they wouldn't want you filling their hospitals (or potentially having infected their nationals) if you tested positive. – Ángel Nov 11 '20 at 0:21
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Canada has extended international travel restrictions through November 30, 2020.

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