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I am a Canadian Permanent Resident and will be getting my citizenship next year. I am planning to marry my partner in UK who is currently on LLR in UK.

As a Canadian citizen, will I need to apply for a marriage visitor visa? I know that as a citizen I would be able to travel without a visa and can stay up to 6 months in UK. For marriage, do I need a specific visa or is it sufficient to provide a notice of marriage to the marriage registry in UK 70 days prior to my visit for marriage?

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If you’re planning to visit the UK with the intention of getting married, you should apply for a Marriage Visitor visa (MVV) https://www.gov.uk/check-uk-visa/y/canada/

If you don’t have a MVV you can still give notice of your intention to get married or form a civil partnership but the immigration authorities at the Home Office will be told.

The Home Office might:

  • ask questions about you and your relationship - if this happens you may need to wait up to 70 days before getting married or forming a civil partnership

  • decide not to approve your notice - if this happens you cannot get married or form a civil partnership in the UK

https://www.gov.uk/marriages-civil-partnerships

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The fact your future spouse is on LLR suggests that they are neither British or an EEA citizen which is important as it means that you gain no immigration advantage in marrying them.

Technically, you're not allowed to get married as a visitor and need to hold the proper entry clearance. For the reasons I've stated I doubt you'd encounter a problem getting the visa, assuming you have a job or some other ties to Canada.

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  • Thanks for the answer. I am employed and own a property here in Canada, looking at the UK requirements, it can take up to 70 days to get a clearance/visa to get married in the UK. My future spouse is applying for ILR soon as he has been in the UK for 10 years now, perhaps that can be beneficial for me to get a residency permit in UK, and I am also applying for Canadian citizenship next month. We are going to see who obtains their citizenship/long residency first and then go from there. – Zan Aug 31 '20 at 14:58

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