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I hold Israeli citizenship and passport and I am currently residing in Bangkok; I reside here nearly two years already - I didn't visit Israel since I came here. I don't hold Israeli residency status (i.e I am "a citizen which isn't a resident").

My current Thailand visa is amnesty visa which should end on 26/09/20.

If I won't be able to obtain a new (non-amnesty) visa, I do plan to stay somewhere in east Asia or in a nearby part of Oceania.

My problem

While Thailand is a Covid-19 safe country with respectively very low number of cases and deaths, a "green country", Israel is a Covid-19 struck country, a "red country" and currently (17/07/20) Israeli passport holders generally aren't allowed to enter almost any country.

My question

Because I plan to stay as near as to Thailand as I can (for 3-6 months), I ask:

In general, can immigration officers in airports make exceptions for citizens which aren't residents of Covid-19 struck states?

In other words, if a border officer examines my passport and can understand that indeed I didn't visit Israel for almost two years but the government of that person's state generally prohibits Israeli citizens from entering, do such officers, in general, have the authority to make an exception as I described?

Update

I think I shouldn't ask several different questions each one almost identical but about another state; I would want to know about Vietnam, Laos, Philippines, Hong Kong and Singapore.

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    If you want to know whether agents in a specific country are given any leeway, that's probably answerable. But I don't think we can realistically answer whether immigration officers "in general" have discretion on such rules, there are far too many variables between different countries. – Chris H Aug 17 at 12:39
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    Thanks @ChrisH ; I think I shouldn't ask several different questions each one almost identical but about another state; I would want to know about Vietnam, Laos, Philippines, Hong Kong and Singapore. – George Aug 17 at 12:42
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    You might not be asking the right questions, neither immigration officers nor your Israeli citizenship seem to be the main issue. Covid-19 restrictions are often based on provenance rather than citizenship but the countries listed (I double-checked two) mostly stopped admitting all non-resident foreign nationals, even Thai citizens/residents without particularly singling out Israel. In some cases, even citizens had issues coming back. In any case, if you are clearly ineligible, you might not even make it to an immigration officer. – Relaxed Aug 17 at 13:01
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    Another way to phrase the question that would be both broader yet focused enough to avoid the earlier objection could be: “Is there any country in (South-)East Asia that could currently admit a non-resident foreign citizen for an extended visit?” – Relaxed Aug 17 at 13:06
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    The simple fact is that if you don't meet the requirements for entry, you're never going to be able to even talk to the airport immigration staff as you will be denied boarding before your flight leaves Thailand. – Doc Aug 17 at 21:23
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Israeli passport holders generally aren't allowed to enter almost any country.

Your assumption is false. Most (not all, but most) countries determine who's allowed to enter based on where they have been, not their nationality.

So what you need to do is find a country that both a) allows people who have been in Thailand for the past 14 days, and b) will grant an Israeli citizen a tourist visa. The second part is likely to be much harder, since almost all countries in Asia/Pacific have stopped allowing entry to tourists, regardless of where they are from. But South Korea might still be an option?

Vietnam, Laos, Philippines, Hong Kong and Singapore.

I believe all five of these countries have stopped issuing tourist visas, regardless of nationality or origin.

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    The IATA COVID-19 Travel Regulations Map is a good way to find potential destinations. It appears you are correct about the five countries mentioned, though the restrictions for Laos simply say "All flights suspended until 31 August" and it's conceivable that there are different restrictions for land entry. – Michael Seifert Aug 18 at 12:08

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