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Can anyone tell me the meaning of this South Korean street sign?

It looks like a speed limit to me, but the colors are inverted (white font on black instead of black font on white). I searched different websites that deal with driving abroad, but I can't find anything. Wikipedia does not have it either.

I was able to translate the text in the bottom one ("school zone from here, slow down"), but I also found signs with the exact same text that have a normal (black on white) speed limit printed on them.

I wonder whether this is just a variant of the regular speed limit or whether it holds any special meaning that I should be aware of.

Example 1

Example 1

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    At least in Europe, both variations of the sign have the same meaning. I have never though seen the 'white print on black background' on a printed sign. It is usually only used on electronic displays as in this example: en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Vehicle-activated_sign#/media/… – Tor-Einar Jarnbjo Aug 14 at 15:26
  • I've seen the inverted colors occasionally in the US when there are dual signs showing different speed limits at night (interstates in Texas, I think), but I doubt that's relevant for a school zone. – ex-user3761894 Aug 15 at 17:46
  • @ex-user3761894 academia in Korea end late :-) but more seriously night speed signs in the US typically (99% or always) mention "night". – Franck Dernoncourt Aug 16 at 18:05
  • @Tor-EinarJarnbjo Thanks! I am aware of the electronic signs in Europe, but I think the reason they are inverted is that the LED-based signs are cheaper to manufacture this way. I don't see any reason why you would do this for a painted sign, so I was curious. In the example above, there seems to be a lamp fixated above the sign (and only the speed limit), so I was wondering whether the inversion of the sign has something to do with visibility at night. Maybe they use a reflective color for the numbers? – Cerno Aug 17 at 9:29
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I wonder whether this is just a variant of the regular speed limit or whether it holds any special meaning that I should be aware of.

Just a variant of the regular speed limit. Red circle = obligation http://dl.koroad.or.kr/license/en/sub/trafficSigns.jsp (mirror) the blue within the red circle doesn't mean anything, just a color variation.

Source: I drove in South Korea (beware that they are many automated speed cameras -> Android or iOS navigation app that gives an alert when close to a speed camera in South Korea).

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    Could you clarify how you know this? Did you take driving lessons in South Korea, or do some personal research on South Korean road signs before driving there? Having driven there doesn’t in itself suggest that you know what this sign means any more than OP does. – Chris H Aug 16 at 17:05
  • @ChrisH red circle = obligation dl.koroad.or.kr/license/en/sub/trafficSigns.jsp; the blue within the red circle doesn't mean anything, just a color variation. – Franck Dernoncourt Aug 16 at 18:12
  • Thanks, but could you please clarify? The link does not give any indication about white on black signs. Also I don't understand what you mean by "blue within the red circle", as this is not part of my question at all, nor do I see any blue speed limits behind the link. – Cerno Aug 17 at 7:47
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@FrankDernoncourt's answer is correct. Here is a translation of the sign:

어린이 보호 구역: children protection area.

여기부터 속도를 줄이시오: Slow down from here.

So this sign is probably in an area with schools/kindergarten/private academy and asks the drivers to slow down.

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