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I applied for a UK work visa recently and when filling the form I answered “no” with respect to have you ever been refused visa to the UK. However upon discussion with my parents I was informed I was refused a visiting visa as a minor (14 years) 12 years ago. Do I need to update my application as I am yet to do my biometrics.

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    Do not worry. You were minor, and you didn't complete the form. It seems good faith (and you were not responsible at the time, as minor). You cannot be blamed (by UK foreign office) on something you cannot be blamed by laws – Giacomo Catenazzi Jul 24 at 12:50
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    @GiacomoCatenazzi deception is deception, regardless of whether the subject of the deception occurred when the applicant was a minor. If the Home Office thinks the current application is deceptive, it will be refused. It is of utmost importance for the applicant to tell the Home Office immediately. Otherwise the Home Office may conclude that the application is deceptive. Michael is definitely right to be worried. – phoog Jul 24 at 13:22
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    @Giacomo Catenazzi It’s not really a question of blame, IMHO. UKVI could well conclude that the OP did not truthfully answer the question about any previous refusals. It would be much better, IMHO, to withdraw this application and submit another with the correct information, rather than risk a refusal on a work visa application that could prove very difficult/costly/time-consuming to overcome. – Traveller Jul 24 at 13:23
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    @GiacomoCatenazzi but UK visa officers are well known for making unreasonable findings of deception, and the consequences of such a finding include a ten-year ban. Of course the moral and ethical thing for the Home Office to do is not to hold this against the applicant, but in the last several years the Home Office has shown every inclination to act in an immoral and unethical manner towards visa applicants. Advising to someone in this position "not to worry" is simply irresponsible. You have nothing to lose if you're wrong, but the same is not true for Michael. – phoog Jul 25 at 4:12
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    @GiacomoCatenazzi if the Home Office alleges deception, the only evidence Michael will be able to offer is his word, and the Home Office has too much experience with genuinely deceptive applicants to trust anyone's word. The best evidence Michael can possibly have that the omission was unintentional will be his taking immediate action to correct the omission once it comes to his attention. Only if he does that will he be able to protect himself against a possible finding of deception. – phoog Jul 25 at 4:16
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Yes, you definitely should update your application.

Contact UKVI using the link Traveller gave you, with an explanation of what happened. You may possibly be refused a visa, but giving false information on a visa application - intentional or not - can be considered deception and might get you a ban. UK visa authorities can pull up your records and so will know about your refusal. Your explanation seems reasonable to me, and even at age 14 the refusal is not going to weigh very heavily against you.

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    As a minor, did he apply for a visa and was denied, or did his legal guardians do it for him? – o.m. Jul 24 at 16:22
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    "depending on how young you were at the time of the refusal" -- OP explicitly provides this info (he was 14), so it should be possible for your answer to address this specifically rather than just say "depending". – nanoman Jul 25 at 3:59
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    @o.m. It doesn't matter. Regardless of who was legally responsible for the visa application, Michael was refused a visa. When asked "have you ever been refused a visa," he must answer in the affirmative. – phoog Jul 25 at 4:21
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    @Michael I confirm phoog is correct – Crazydre Jul 26 at 14:43
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    While it was you who had a Visa refused, andvuou need to report it, that doesn't mean you will necessarily be held responsible for the contents of the previous application to the same extent as if you had made it as an adult. – DJClayworth Jul 30 at 2:54

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