1

I need to immigrate to Boston Before JUNE 18 (the date at which my immigrant visa expires) . I have a ticket to London where I arrive at 18:30 Local time. The second ticket I'm considering to book leaves the next day at 11:15 am May 23 to Boston from Heathrow Airport. According to the UK gov website, I won't need a transit visa according to some conditions that I know I fulfill the most of, but there are some I'm not sure of, one of which is the one below:

- Have a confirmed onward flight that leaves on the day you arrive or before midnight on the day after you arrive

Does it mean that if I get to London at 18:30 On may 22, I can leave before 23:59 On may 23 without needing a transit visa?

Also, while you're at it, the UK GOV website says that to transit without a visa, I need to fulfill: 'you’re travelling to (or on part of a reasonable journey to) Australia, Canada, New Zealand or the USA and have a valid visa for that country'

I have an F4 immigrant visa, does that qualify?

Also, There's the EU travel ban. Does it mean that I can't enter the US? Cause my visa is just an F4 immigrant visa. However, on the Presidential proclamation it says that this classification is excluded:

(v) any alien who is the child, foster child, or ward of a U.S. citizen or lawful permanent resident, or who is a prospective adoptee seeking to enter the United States pursuant to the IR-4 or IH-4 visa classifications;

My mother already entered the US with her F4 immigrant visa and she has her passport stamped by the CBP, which means that her visa serves as a residency for 1 year before she gets her actual Green card. Does she qualify as an LPR? According to the USCIS website, i think she is:

Effective Date of Lawful Permanent Residence. A person is generally considered to be an LPR at the time USCIS approves the applicant's adjustment application or at the time the applicant enters and is admitted into the United States with an immigrant visa.

Also, I'm 17, so I'm a dependant child. My brother also has his immigrant visa stamped, so he is considered an LPR if the same rules apply. But he is over 21, so I can't use this exclusion in the Presidential proclamation:

(iv) any alien who is the sibling of a U.S. citizen or lawful permanent resident, provided that both are unmarried and under the age of 21;

  • Is this two separate flight bookings? What would you do if the Boston flight is cancelled? – Traveller May 17 at 22:07
  • @Traveller Very good question, but I assured that it wouldn't be cancelled. I did the same mistake with a previous flight I booked and it was cancelled. This one however, is shown on the Heathrow Departure list and it is listed by British And American airways that it is the only flight being flown in from London to Boston, and it only happens once a day. I'm going to call them tommorow anyway YES, these are two separate flight bookings. – user111518 May 17 at 22:20
  • 1
    Don't assume that the flight won't be cancelled just because it's listed today. If the aircraft doesn't arrive on it's inbound flight because...reasons...then it could be cancelled at the last minute. It might be cancelled in the last day or two before departure because it has too few passengers, or several other reasons. Ensure you have a plan. – user105640 May 17 at 22:33
  • @Arthur'sPass TBH I will probably have no way of returning home if it was cancelled. But it's highly unlikely that it will be canceled, no? The plane flies every day to and from Boston. I don't see why this will change? It's listed on AA and BA as their only flight that comes and goes daily from London to Boston. – user111518 May 17 at 22:43
0

Does it mean that if I get to London at 18:30 On may 22, I can leave before 23:59 On may 23 without needing a transit visa?

Yes, that's exactly what it means.

I have an F4 immigrant visa, does that qualify?

Yes, an F4 immigrant visa is a US visa. It qualifies.

I cannot answer the others.

| improve this answer | |
0

Does it mean that if I get to London at 18:30 On may 22, I can leave before 23:59 On may 23 without needing a transit visa?

Yes.

I have an F4 immigrant visa, does that qualify?

Yes.

My mother already entered the US with her F4 immigrant visa and she has her passport stamped by the CBP, which means that her visa serves as a residency for 1 year before she gets her actual Green card. Does she qualify as an LPR?

Yes. Your mother became a permanent resident the moment she was admitted to the US. (The immigrant visa becomes a temporary green card when it is stamped with the admission stamp.)

| improve this answer | |
  • Great, do I need any proof that she is an LPR? Or will the CBP officer have that on his computer or smth? Also, if they ask me for surefire proof that I will be able to enter the US from London, do I need to get any documents with me? Like proof that my mother is an LPR? – user111518 May 18 at 2:08
  • @dwarfhunter12 I would bring any evidence I can of her status. A copy of her stamped immigrant visa and a copy of your birth certificate showing that she is your mother would be the best option. CBP probably has it in their computer systems, but the airline won't have access to that information. And even with CBP, it's better to have it on paper than to rely on their looking it up -- if you get an uncooperative officer, or if there's a technical failure, you might avoid some delay or worse by having the copies on hand. – phoog May 22 at 9:06