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My new luggage has tsa lock which I thought naively was a good thing. But having second thought after reading other's experiences. Nothing valuable in my bag, have free baggage check-in, just will zipper it all like I always did on short flight and forget about the tsa lock. Had a brief moment of "stress" just thinking about what "if" I can't open it. Travelling twice a year is stressful, why add another component. Has anyone else made similar decision? just zip it?

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One advantage of the TSA locks is that it is easy to get spare keys for them. Look at the number on the lock (should be TSA00n with n between 1 and 7) and then search ebay for keys.

Or go to https://github.com/Xyl2k/TSA-Travel-Sentry-master-keys where you can download the files to print a key yourself (or have someone print one for you).

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    Oh great - if my case is lost or stolen at least I know the thief or person finding it will be able to open it :-( – Traveller Jan 6 at 8:06
  • As if thieves bother with keys, they just break the case. I would (and have) just zip it. Wire through the little rings on the zip to keep it close. – Willeke Jan 6 at 8:09
  • Yes. TSA locks aren't really locks. I usually now put zipties on... I want to know if my case has been opened in transit. I am not worried about theft as all that is in my luggage is clothes, toiletries and a spare phone/laptop charger. – Krist van Besien Jan 6 at 8:09
  • Like @Krist, I also use zip ties rather than locks. But, there is one notable advantage to using a lock, which is that it will continue to keep the luggage securely closed even after the TSA or other agency decides they want to open your luggage. They will cut a zip tie but won't replace it. How important this is depends on how much you trust the baggage handlers to not accidentally (or even "accidentally") open your luggage during handling. – Peter Duniho Jan 7 at 18:40

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