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My new luggage has tsa lock which I thought naively was a good thing. But having second thought after reading other's experiences. Nothing valuable in my bag, have free baggage check-in, just will zipper it all like I always did on short flight and forget about the tsa lock. Had a brief moment of "stress" just thinking about what "if" I can't open it. Travelling twice a year is stressful, why add another component. Has anyone else made similar decision? just zip it?

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One advantage of the TSA locks is that it is easy to get spare keys for them. Look at the number on the lock (should be TSA00n with n between 1 and 7) and then search ebay for keys.

Or go to https://github.com/Xyl2k/TSA-Travel-Sentry-master-keys where you can download the files to print a key yourself (or have someone print one for you).

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    Oh great - if my case is lost or stolen at least I know the thief or person finding it will be able to open it :-(
    – Traveller
    Jan 6 '20 at 8:06
  • As if thieves bother with keys, they just break the case. I would (and have) just zip it. Wire through the little rings on the zip to keep it close.
    – Willeke
    Jan 6 '20 at 8:09
  • Yes. TSA locks aren't really locks. I usually now put zipties on... I want to know if my case has been opened in transit. I am not worried about theft as all that is in my luggage is clothes, toiletries and a spare phone/laptop charger. Jan 6 '20 at 8:09
  • Like @Krist, I also use zip ties rather than locks. But, there is one notable advantage to using a lock, which is that it will continue to keep the luggage securely closed even after the TSA or other agency decides they want to open your luggage. They will cut a zip tie but won't replace it. How important this is depends on how much you trust the baggage handlers to not accidentally (or even "accidentally") open your luggage during handling. Jan 7 '20 at 18:40

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