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For which planes do Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) regulations apply? Do they apply to all planes entering the United States and all planes departing the United States? Do they also apply to planes registered in the United States but flying between airports outside the United States?

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    I suspect you're looking for our sister site Aviation. – Michael Hampton Dec 18 '19 at 1:16
  • @MichaelHampton thanks, I am ok to move the question there if it is more on topic on aviation. The reason why I posted the question on Travel is that travelers sometime look for regulations that apply to their planes (e.g. regulations purtaining to portable batteries in carry-on luggage). – Franck Dernoncourt Dec 18 '19 at 1:19
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    Rules about carrying batteries may involve the FAA, or (more likely IMO) the TSA and DHS. The common thread is Aviation, so I agree with @MichaelHampton that aviation.stackexchange.com is a better site. – DavidSupportsMonica Dec 18 '19 at 1:22
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    Different FAA regulations will apply to certain planes for different reasons. Some may apply because the plane is registered in the US. Others may apply because the plane is owned by a US carrier or by a foreign carrier approved to operate in the US. Others may apply because the plane is built in the US. Others may apply because the plane is flying through US airspace. I am going to vote to close as too broad, but the question should be easily answerable (and on topic here) if you change it to "which planes are affected by [that specific FAA regulation cited by TSA] and why?" – phoog Dec 18 '19 at 2:29
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    I'm voting to close this question as off-topic because it is about aviation rules that do not apply to the general traveller. – Jan Dec 18 '19 at 11:16
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In a comment, you say that you're interested in the FAA regulation cited by the TSA in its page on airline passengers carrying lithium batteries in their luggage. That regulation is 49 CFR 175.10(a)(18). It basically applies to any aircraft flying to, from, or within the US, and all aircraft registered in the US, with some exceptions noted below, and perhaps some other exceptions that I have not identified.

The scope of the regulation is given in 49 CFR 175.1, which defines "Purpose, scope and applicability" for all of 49 CFR 175:

§ 175.1 Purpose, scope and applicability.

(a) This part prescribes requirements that apply to the transportation of hazardous materials in commerce aboard (including attached to or suspended from) aircraft. The requirements in this part are in addition to other requirements contained in parts 171, 172, 173, 178, and 180 of this subchapter.

(b) This part applies to the offering, acceptance, and transportation of hazardous materials in commerce by aircraft to, from, or within the United States, and to any aircraft of United States registry anywhere in air commerce. This subchapter applies to any person who performs, attempts to perform, or is required to perform any function subject to this subchapter, including -

(1) Air carriers, indirect air carriers, and freight forwarders and their flight and non-flight employees, agents, subsidiary and contract personnel (including cargo, passenger and baggage acceptance, handling, loading and unloading personnel); and

(2) Air passengers that carry any hazardous material on their person or in their carry-on or checked baggage.

(c) This part does not apply to aircraft of United States registry under lease to and operated by foreign nationals outside the United States if:

(1) Hazardous materials forbidden aboard aircraft by § 172.101 of this subchapter are not carried on the aircraft; and

(2) Other hazardous materials are carried in accordance with the regulations of the State (nation) of the aircraft operator.

(d) The requirements of this subchapter do not apply to transportation of hazardous material in support of dedicated air ambulance, firefighting, or search and rescue operations performed in compliance with the operator requirements under federal air regulations, title 14 of the CFR.

For reference, "commerce" is defined at 49 CFR 171.8 as

trade or transportation in the jurisdiction of the United States within a single state; between a place in a state and a place outside of the state; that affects trade or transportation between a place in a state and place outside of the state; or on a United States-registered aircraft.

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Answer in a comment from phoog:

Different FAA regulations will apply to certain planes for different reasons. Some may apply because the plane is registered in the US. Others may apply because the plane is owned by a US carrier or by a foreign carrier approved to operate in the US. Others may apply because the plane is built in the US. Others may apply because the plane is flying through US airspace.

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  • @phoog I'll remove this answer if you add this information to your answer. – Franck Dernoncourt Dec 18 '19 at 8:18
  • I didn't include this in my answer because I didn't have time to identify a specific FAA regulation with different scope. Furthermore, given that this is Travel, I would only want to use a regulation that has some visibility to commercial air passengers, which would make it even more time consuming to identify a suitable regulation. – phoog Dec 18 '19 at 13:37

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