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I am working in Kuwait, and my mom, dad and my younger brother are living in India. My mom wants to visit the UK on her own, and I am happy to sponsor her trip. However she is unemployed and has no funds on her own apart from what I provide her.

Accommodation: We have another relative who is happy to provide accommodation to my mom.

Funds: My mom's bank statements will have periodic deposits made by me. I will write a sponsorship letter saying I can cover all charges. I am in good financial situation myself and I can provide my statements.

Family connection: As my mom wants to travel alone, she leaves dad and brother back in India. We will be providing the ration card as proof that they are living in the same house. They will also write a sponsorship letter, and provide a property document in my brother's name.

Are these strong grounds for a visitor visa, or is there any reason for rejection or suspicion? What can I do to strengthen this application?

  • Does your mum have any prior travel history? There’s nothing to prevent you sponsoring her trip but there are some red flags from an immigration risk assessment point of view such as unemployed + no dependents in home country + relative in the UK = easier to stay illegally; needing a sponsor can also be a disadvantage. – Traveller Nov 23 '19 at 13:56
  • She has no prior travel history. Can husband and son not be considered dependents in home country? – Hari Nov 23 '19 at 14:11
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    How are her husband and son dependents if your mum is unemployed and dependent on you for funds? – Traveller Nov 23 '19 at 15:14
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  • Are these strong grounds for a visitor visa, or is there any reason for rejection or suspicion? No, they’re not strong grounds. There are several weaknesses in the circumstances you describe. For example, no prior travel history (as you mention in a comment), and no ties to home (job, assets) apart from family. This question explains the likely outcome UK visa refusal on V 4.2 a + c (and sometimes 'e')

  • What can I do to strengthen this application? Nothing, if you’ve described the circumstances accurately. You can’t invent what doesn’t exist.

  • Is a property in son's name in India not a "tie" to the home country? – Bravo Nov 23 '19 at 20:18
  • @Bravo Yes - but for the son, not the mother. – Traveller Nov 23 '19 at 20:30
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No one can predict how your visa process will go, but judging from the vast majority of visa related questions - my guess is your visa will be rejected. You have to understand that the visa issuing authorities are assuming you are a "de-facto immigrant", that is, they are looking for reasons why you would likely break the terms of the visa (don't return, claim asylum, over stay) or rely on public funds.

It is on you to prove otherwise, and by you it is meant the traveler (in this case, your mom).

As written, your case is very weak as the primary deciding factor is your mom's travel history and circumstances; not yours.

This statement is the most concerning to me:

As my mom wants to travel alone, she leaves dad and brother back in India. We will be providing the ration card as proof that they are living in the same house. They will also write a sponsorship letter, and provide a property document in my brother's name.

I am not sure how this will help your mom's petition. How can they be writing a sponsorship letter, if you are the one paying for the trip?

A property in your _____ (brother, cousin, son, wife, etc.) name is not helping your mom's case. Typically such a document is used to provide ties to the place you are traveling from.

You mom saying that her son has property in his name is not really an incentive for your mom to return.

If you were traveling with your mom, things would perhaps be different.

My recommendation:

Have your relative in the UK (the one providing accommodation) write a letter of financial sponsorship. This letter must include costs they will bear, proof of their own economic status, and relationship to your mom.

This means that the relative (in the UK) is assuming the costs of your mom's trip; or that they are inviting your mom to visit them.

Again, as written its not a strong case.

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