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We are used to having mangoes, bananas and other fresh fruits and vegetables, in our checked-in luggage from Manila and take them to Geneva, Switzerland.

The last time I flew out of the Philippines with fresh Philippine produce was in March 2019.

I don't carry fresh or dried meat or fish products.

Nobody said nor was there any indication that it was not allowed.

Can I still do that, that is, with regards to Manila customs regulations?
Swiss customs allow them anyway.

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    It's unclear what you're asking. Are you asking about bringing fruits and vegetables from the Philippines to Switzerland? Manila (Philippine) customs won't care what you're taking out of the Philippines. – DavidSupportsMonica Nov 13 '19 at 1:53
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When entering Switzerland from a non-EEA country, you can, at least for private purposes, per person import up to 10kg of most kinds of fruit and vegetables, including mangos and bananas.

Swiss Customs has an information page on this subject. It lists in section 1b some plants and fruits, which may not be imported at all. Other, allowed plants, fruits and vegetables are usually 'subject to inspection by the phytosanitary service', but with the following exception:

2 b) Import from other (non-EEA) countries ... Allowance per person: cut flowers (bouquets) up to 3 kg maximum and fruits and vegetables (except for potatoes) up to 10 kg overall are not subject to phytosanitary measures.

Be aware that the EU regulations differ from the Swiss regulations. If you transit through an EU country on your way to Switzerland, you may be subject to other restrictions.

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Short answer: (pertaining to Switzerland and European Union only)

Travelers from the Philippines may generally not bring fruits and vegetables into Switzerland and European Union.

The regulations differ slightly and since they are hard to find have been listed below (and where needed translated) with the corresponding sources.


Long answer:

having mangoes, bananas and other fresh fruits and vegetables, in our checked-in luggage from Manila

Nobody said nor was there any indication that it was not allowed.

It is true, that there is no sign listing everything you are not allowed to do at each border point

  • this does, however, not allow you to do anything not explicitly meantioned
    • murdering peaple being one of them

Swiss customs allow them anyway.

Did you stop at the Swiss Customs, show them the fruits and vegetables and ask if they are allowed?

  • lets assume you did not, since the official sources contradict this claim

At an airport inside the European Union Customs Area you would have been told that Mangos (and possibly others of your unnamed fruits) was not allowed without a Phytosanitary Certificate when importing from the Philippines.

Allthough it is true that Switzerland is not part of the European Union Customs area, it would be wrong to assume that both do not share common rules when it is in their common interest. The Swiss VEAGOG regulation, as a sample, often quotes EU norms.

The Swiss Airport Zürich site (in German) also contains a clear statement on this topic:

Vegetable goods
The import of live plants and plant parts (including fruits / vegetables) from non-EU and non-EFTA countries and the Canary Islands is subject to restrictions or prohibited.

where a link to the Swiss Customs site goes into details:

b) Import from other states Plants imported from countries other than the EU, Norway and Iceland (live or as part of plants) and flower bulbs are under the control of the plant protection service or may not be imported (see point 1b).
Anyone wishing to import such plants or plant products must inquire in good time before importation from the Federal Office of Agriculture about the applicable provisions.

Items that may not be imported (point 1b):

a) Originating in all countries
Miniature medlar (Cotoneaster) 
Photinia - Photinia davidiana (syn. Stranvaesia davidiana) 

b) Originating in all countries other than EU, Norway and Iceland
Apple tree (Malus)
Pear tree (Pyrus)
Oak (Quercus)
Mountain Ash, or hawthorn and rowan (Sorbus)
Firethorn (Pyracantha) 
Potato and the like, other Solanaceae (Solanacea)
Real, edible chestnuts (Castanea) 
Medlar (Mespilus)
Coniferous woods (conifers)
Quince tree (Cydonia)
Vines (Vitis)
Roses
Drupaceous trees (apricots, cherry, almond, peach, plum and damson) and all flowering types of the prunus variety
Hawthorn (Crataegus) all types and varieties 
Loquat (Eriobotrya)
Flowering quince or quince (Chaenomeles) 
Kumquat (Fortunella)
Bitter orange or seville orange (Poncirus)
Citrus plants (Citrus)

Except for items that may not be imported

  • which seems to also include Mangos

Allowance per person: cut flowers (bouquets) up to 3 kg maximum and fruits and vegetables (except for potatoes) up to 10 kg overall are not subject to phytosanitary measures.


European Union:

When importing any of fruits listed below a Phytosanitary Certificate is needed

  • such fruits must be reported to customs on arrival

Exception:

  • from European non-EU countries and the bordering Mediterranean:
    • total of 3 kg are allowed

Unofficial list of fruits that need a Phytosanitary Certificate

and been listed elswhere (translated from German) as:

Annone                             Annona spp.  
Apple                              malus spp.  
Eggplant (eggplant)                Solanum melongena 
pear (also Nashi pear              Pyrus spp. 
Bitter balsam gourd                Momordica spp. 
Blueberry / cranberry              Vaccinium spp. 
Pomegranate punica granatum guava  psidium spp. 
Persimmon (lotus fruit, persimmon) Diospyro spp. 
Potatoes (except sweet potato)     Solanum tuberosum 
Kumquats (including hybrids)       Fortunatella spp 
Mango                              Mangifera spp. 
Passion fruit, Curuba              Passiflora spp. 
Malay apple (Jambos)               Syzgium spp. 
Paprika, chillies, chili           Capsicum spp. 
Poncirus 
- bitter orange, incl. hybrids     Poncirus spp  
Stone fruit 
- cherries, plums, peaches, 
nectarine                          Prunus. spp
tomato                             Solanum lycopersicum 
Quince        Cydonia spp. 
Cassis, gooseberries               Ribes spp. 
Citrus fruits: all sorts,
- orange, mandarin, clementine, swinglea, Naringi, grapefruit, finger / lime
- Citrus spp, Swinglea spp., Microcitrus spp., Naringi spp.


Phytosanitary Certificate

Certain plants, plant products and other objects (listed in Part B, Annex V - Directive 2000/29/EC) entering the EU must have a phytosanitary certificate guaranteeing that they are:

  • properly inspected;
  • free from quarantine harmful organisms and practically free from other harmful organisms;
  • in line with the plant health regulations of the importing country.

From Directive 2000/29/EC Annex V, Part B:

3. Fruits of:
— Citrus L., Fortunella Swingle, Poncirus Raf., Microcitrus Swingle, Naringi Adans., Swinglea Merr. and their hybrids, Momordica L., and Solanaceae,
— Actinidia Lindl., Annona L., Carica papaya L., Cydonia Mill., Diospyros L., Fragaria L., Malus L., Mangifera L; Passiflora L., Persea americana Mill., Prunus L., Psidium L; Pyrus L., Ribes L., Rubus L., Syzygium Gaertn., Vaccinium L., and Vitis L.


Sources:

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  • 3
    This answer is wrong. You have linked to a lot of regulations here without reading them completely. Private import of smaller amounts of fruit and vegetables to Switzerland is in most cases allowed and exempt from phytosanitary checks. – Tor-Einar Jarnbjo Nov 13 '19 at 14:32
  • @Tor-EinarJarnbo How is Plants imported from countries other than the EU, Norway and Iceland... are under the control of the plant protection service or may not be imported not clear? – Mark Johnson Nov 13 '19 at 14:40
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    See my answer. I can say again: Import of smaller amounts of fruit and vegetables to Switzerland is in most cases allowed and exempt from phytosanitary checks. It is clearly stated on one of the pages you are linking to yourself. 'Under control' and 'may not be imported' does clearly not mean that import is prohibited. – Tor-Einar Jarnbjo Nov 13 '19 at 14:47
  • @Tor-EinarJarnbo that exception does not apply to fruits/vegetables that may not be imported. The '2)' comes before the 'or', so all citrus fall under fruit that may not be imported. So a general statement that all small amount are allowed or as the OP claimed everything is still not correct. – Mark Johnson Nov 13 '19 at 15:05
  • Did I ever claim that all small amounts are allowed? Where did you get that from? – Tor-Einar Jarnbjo Nov 13 '19 at 15:08

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