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If someone was in another country for study purposes for 6/7 months, and for 3 months of this time he went back home to sell his home furniture and give back the rent money, and they did not tell anyone, for example Canadian Immigration, what would happen? Would they understand?

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    So you are from country X and have a visa to study in Canada for 6-7 months, but halfway through you want to return to country X to deal with domestic issues and then continue your studies in Canada? And you want to know if you can do this without telling the Canadian immigration authorities? – Weather Vane Aug 30 at 10:35
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    Or were your studies elsewhere and now you want to apply to Canada without revealing some or all of your previous travel history? Has your study visa expired? – Traveller Aug 30 at 10:58
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    I still don't really understand what you are saying, but the general rule is, if the officer asks you anything, never lie! If he doesn't ask you, you don't need to tell, but if you tell something, make sure it's the truth. Lying can result in deportation or even a ban. – dunni Aug 30 at 11:32
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    Why would you want to lie? Are you worried that Canadian immigration will interpret your actions as demonstrating lack of ties to India? If so, you really need to handle that directly rather than lying about it. Where are your ties? If you now consider, say, Belgium to be your home, then gather evidence of ties to Belgium so that Canadian immigration is not worried that you want to stay in Canada. Second, you might be able to couch your activities in more broad (but honest) language, like "visiting family and handling financial transactions", and wait to see if they want more details. – Columbia says Reinstate Monica Aug 30 at 11:47
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    Well, if they ask in a form if you have been in another country, and you say no, it's a lie which can result in visa denial and even a ban. So again, if they ask you that question, answer truthfully. – dunni Aug 30 at 11:49