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This question already has an answer here:

I have british passport holder and my wife has UK RESIDENT PERMIT -

NO TIME LIMIT** and is SETTLEMENT Type so We like to travel Portugal, my

wife need a visa.

Thanks

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marked as duplicate by ahmedus, choster, David, bytebuster, k2moo4 Jul 13 at 2:26

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    Are you asking if your wife needs a visa to go with you to Portugal? – DJClayworth Jul 12 at 19:13
  • I guess from the tag that your wife is an Indian citizen with an Indian passport as well as the UK Resident Permit? What passport does she have? – Andrew Leach Jul 12 at 20:45
  • Surely this has been asked and answered before, but I don't have time to search for a suitable duplicate. Yes, your wife needs a visa. – phoog Jul 12 at 20:52
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    @ahmedus it’s a duplicate in a way, however, that question is asking about how easy it is to get a visa, whereas this question is asking whether visa is the only option and whether it would be possible to enter Portugal without a visa. – kiradotee Jul 12 at 23:49
1

Timatic says the following regarding your situation:

National India (IN)             /Residence United Kingdom (GB)
Embarkation United Kingdom (GB) /Destination Portugal (PT)

[Visa Information - Destination] Portugal (PT)

[Information For Normal Passports]
Passport required.
- Passports and other documents accepted for entry must be
  valid for a minimum of 3 months beyond the period of
  intended stay. 

Visa required, except for Family members of a national of an
EEA Member State or Switzerland, with a residence permit
issued by United Kingdom to family members of a Union Citizen.
They are visa exempt for a maximum stay of 90 days.

[...]

Warning:
[...]
- Union Citizens are nationals of an EEA Member State and
  Switzerland who moved from the country of nationality to
  reside in another EEA Member State or in Switzerland.
  The visa exemption for family members of a Union Citizen
  applies if:
  - they travel with or to join the Union Citizen, and
  - the residence permit is issued by: 
  -- the country of residence, which must be different from
  the country of nationality of the Union Citizen, or
  -- the country of nationality of the Union Citizen, if the
  Union Citizen and family member returned within 6 months
  after departing from the country of residence.

So family members of Union Citizens don't require a visa, but you aren't one as you live in your country of nationality (the UK). Therefore, your wife would need a visa.

However, as @kiradotee points out, it should also be possible to get a visa on arrival:

Arriving at the border without an entry visa

It is always best for your non-EU family members to be well-informed in advance and have all the necessary documents before starting their journey.

However, if they arrive at the border with their passport but without an entry visa, the border authorities should give them the opportunity to prove by other means that they are family members of a mobile EU citizen. They can do so by providing proof of their identity and family ties with an EU citizen and, if travelling alone, proof that the EU citizen is already living in the host country. If they manage to prove it, they should be issued with an entry visa on the spot.

While an airline probably still wouldn't let you board (because they follow the Timatic rules), bus or ferry companies might not be as strict, so this might be a way to get to a Schengen country and then further to Portugal without having a visa in advance.

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    He is not a Union Citizen unfortunately. “Union Citizens are nationals of an EEA Member State and Switzerland who moved from the country of nationality to reside in another EEA Member State or in Switzerland." He is a British citizen living in Britain. Therefore, the residence permit card she has is issued under the UK law and not an Article 10 card issued under EU law. – kiradotee Jul 12 at 23:18
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    it’s under “Additional Information:” in Timatic? – kiradotee Jul 12 at 23:25
  • This is not to say they cannot travel per se. They will not be able to fly to Portugal without a “Residence card of a family member of a Union citizen” aka Article 10 card or a visa. I’m not sure about Eurostar/bus/ferry? Timatic doesn’t apply to land crossings and as long as you can reach immigration of the Schengen border you should be able to enter by presenting IDs and a marriage certificate. The problem with flying is you need to convince the airline to fly you to Schengen but Schengen immigration themselves will not have a problem accepting these 2 with the current documents they have. – kiradotee Jul 12 at 23:33
  • I think it does mean that they cannot travel visa-free. Doing the test on the EU's website, the first question "Do you have a residence document from an EU country?" has to be answered with "Yes - I have another residence document, issued under national rules", as you say (no Article 10 card). Then the result is that a visa is needed. And the iinformation on this website appears to be independent of the mode of travel. – Mophotla Jul 12 at 23:40
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    I would say that “Arriving at the border without an entry visa” on that website is what I was thinking of. “if they arrive at the border with their passport but without an entry visa, the border authorities should give them the opportunity to prove by other means that they are family members of a mobile EU citizen. They can do so by providing proof of their identity and family ties with an EU citizen […]. If they manage to prove it, they should be issued with an entry visa on the spot.”. This of course only applies for other means than flying, where you can actually reach Schengen immigration. – kiradotee Jul 12 at 23:56

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