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I overstayed for 18 years in the US. I had an H1B that expired in 2004 that abled me to get an SSN. The expiration of my H1B wasn't my fault but because of technical reasons. I continued working for different employers and never missed paying and filing for my taxes. I have no criminal record. I'm not in the US any longer. Is it possible or just a suicide for me to apply for a new US visa under my maiden name. If possible, any advice? Thank you

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    Your H1-B expired in 2004? That was 15 years ago. How did you manage to overstay for 18 years in a 15-year period? – Nate Eldredge Jun 29 '19 at 2:11
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    Expiry of your H1B may not have been your fault, but staying 15 years out of status most certainly is. You can apply for a visa but it's unlikely you'll ever get one. – user90371 Jun 29 '19 at 2:27
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    Why use your maiden name? I believe the visa application asks about other names. – Patricia Shanahan Jun 29 '19 at 3:38
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    Have I misunderstood or is the idea of applying under your maiden name an attempt to hide your previous overstay? Thereby adding deception to your immigration history? Your chances of getting a visa seem remote but perhaps consulting an Immigration lawyer would be a good idea – Traveller Jun 29 '19 at 6:38
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    If you have legally resumed your maiden name, then of course it is correct to apply under that name. The application asks about former names because of the possibility that someone could hide something this way. You must disclose your name change. – Robert Columbia Jun 29 '19 at 13:15
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It's just suicide. Forget about visiting the USA any time soon.

Immigration is about you as a person, not about the name or passport you use. Application forms ask about former names and former passports. Lying on an application form to try to get around a ban is the sort of thing that gets you banned for life.

  • Suicide is a tragedy that afflicts many families. I think it is inappropriate to suggest that a visa refusal could be somehow comparable. – Richard Beasley Jun 30 '19 at 9:06
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    @RichardBeasley I was just using the language from the question: if you object to it, take it up with the asker. – David Richerby Jun 30 '19 at 9:09

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