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Can I purchase a round trip ticket to Chicago from Los Angeles using my green card for identification?

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    I've never been asked for ID to purchase a domestic flight, although you will need it to get past TSA (but not board the plane). – Azor Ahai Apr 22 at 23:45
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ID requirements for domestic flights are set by TSA and can be found at https://www.tsa.gov/travel/security-screening/identification.

As you can see, permanent resident cards (aka green cards) are accepted.

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    I have, on different occasions, shown TSA my British passport, green card, global entry card, and California driver's license without any problems. – Patricia Shanahan Apr 22 at 21:18
  • People sometimes get by with school-issued student IDs too (but they also sometimes don't). – Mehrdad Apr 22 at 22:20
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    My wife was given a hard time at PHL by TSA once for using her greencard as ID and they made her get her passport out of her bags. The officer did not appreciate me showing her that site and said it was up to her discretion what was accepted... However, that was the only time out of dozens that we have had any issues. – tpg2114 Apr 23 at 0:27
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    @tpg2114 did you also point out that a green card holder doesn't even need a passport to enter the US from abroad? – phoog Apr 23 at 1:30
  • @Mehrdad student IDs are acceptable for people under 18 years of age – DreamConspiracy Apr 23 at 2:18
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If you have a compliant driver's license or state ID (or another acceptable form of identification), you don't even need to show your green card.

You should carry the green card with you because of the law that requires you to keep it in your personal possession at all times, but there is no requirement to have any particular travel document when traveling domestically in the US, and you can't be prevented from traveling without your green card (unless you are arrested for not having it, which is not something that happens frequently as far as I am aware).

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