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I recently visited Ukraine having a tourism visa and with a tourism intention only, once arrived they refused my entry telling me that I don't have certain documents like local bus tickets, a tour guide etc.

To which I got stressed and argued with them that why they gave me visa at first place if documents were missing as this continued for a while the officers put few more extra stamps may be blacklisted for Ukraine and deported is there for sure.

It's not more than 36 hours since my arrival and deportation. I am worried becuase it's really bad when I did nothing wrong i got such stamp becuase someone had power to do bad for my future.

How does it impact my future travel. Please help me with this I don't know whether I will be able to visit any Europe country again.

Also do they mention in some computer system the reason for deportation because I have no idea what they wrote there.

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    This doesn't answer the question, but this link might help: migrationinukraine.com/en/837-2 – TravelLikeBeaker Apr 19 at 16:44
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    The link was more of a guide to hopefully help lead in the right direction. They didn't give you written documentation on why you were deported? – TravelLikeBeaker Apr 19 at 16:50
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    Unfortunately even having a a visa doesn’t automatically guarantee the holder will be permitted to enter any country. Border/Immigration officials are still entitled to refuse entry if they are not satisfied with how you present yourself and your intentions on arrival. Technically it sounds like you were denied entry rather than deported, but you should have been given some paperwork explaining why – Traveller Apr 19 at 16:52
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    @travellikebeaker I have they give it simply as refusal that I failed to prove my intentions. Should I preserve it? For future reference? – Harshit Chaudhary Apr 19 at 16:56
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    I would. like @Traveller stated, just because you have a visa does not guarantee entry into the country. Many factors can result in denial on arrival. Unfortunately, you happen to have that happen to you. In my opinion, I don't think this will prevent you from traveling to Europe again. Just make sure you read entry requirements for your citizenship and the country you are entering in. It's better to have more of what you need than none at all – TravelLikeBeaker Apr 19 at 16:58
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Unfortunately even having a a visa doesn’t automatically guarantee the holder will be permitted to enter any country. Border/Immigration officials are still entitled to refuse entry if they are not satisfied with how you present yourself and your intentions on arrival. As you’ve discovered, arguing is the worst thing you can do in this situation. It is advisable to carry the papers you used to support your visa request with you, and to make sure you can demonstrate, if asked, that you have sufficient funds available to you during your visit and a return/onward ticket to show your intention to leave.

You must keep the paperwork you were given both for your personal reference and because the incident is likely to affect your future travel, depending on where you’d hoped to visit. Certain countries eg UK, typically ask about immigration history over the 10 years prior to an application. You will need to disclose your deportation where this information is required.

  • As the duration of stay was just 24 hours will it help me to present my case? – Harshit Chaudhary Apr 19 at 17:46
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    @Harshit Chaudhary What case? You arrived with a visa and were initially denied entry because you didn’t satisfy Immigration Officers’ questions about your visit. You made a fuss and got deported as a result. Case closed, and on your record. – Traveller Apr 19 at 20:00
  • Not case but the situation. – Harshit Chaudhary Apr 20 at 7:03

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