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Citizenship: Vietnam

Current country: USA

I am applying for Express Entry and let's say I am approved and receive a COPR. Now I don't want to settle in Canada until I have a job offer. Therefore, I would like to go back and forth between Canada and USA for job interviews until I land a job offer, then I will re-enter Canada as a Permanent Resident and start working right away. The reason is so I can keep working at my current job in the USA while waiting for a job offer in Canada.

I know that the PR visa is single-entry, which does not allow me to do that. So is there any way I can do it without jeopardizing my PR status?

Thanks,

Ky

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  • "The reason is so I can keep working at my current job in the USA while waiting for a job offer in Canada": Becoming a permanent resident of Canada does not change your US immigration status, and it will not require you to leave your US job. You should use your immigration documents to enter Canada and become a permanent resident, whereafter you can return to the US and keep working there until you find a job in Canada. Once you become a PR, you no longer need a PR visa to enter Canada. You will receive a different document that shows your PR status and allows you to enter the country. – phoog Feb 12 at 12:57
  • Hello @phoog , Thank you for your advice. I have actually thought about that option. However, I read an article saying it may take 45 days to receive your PR card by mail so I would have to take 45 off work. By then I would be fired from my US job. Is there any way I can go to Canada and get the PR card within days? Thanks. – Ky Nguyen Feb 13 at 5:04
  • Hm. There doesn't seem to be one. The US takes care of this by designating the used immigrant visa as a temporary green card valid for one year. You could apply for a PR travel document after you return to the US, in order to get into Canada, but I don't know how long they take, nor whether they're valid for multiple uses. They cost $50. – phoog Feb 13 at 16:27
  • No problem. That was really good information. Thank you @phoog. I think I may have to go there and start looking for a job there. Will have to survive a few months of unemployment :) – Ky Nguyen 2 days ago
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The OP talks about being approved and receiving a COPR, to get your COPR if you're from a nationality that needs a visa to enter Canada, then you need to submit your passport to CPC; they then return your passport with an immigrant visa and issue you a COPR. Once you've been issued an immigrant visa, previous tourist visas are moot. At this point you can only enter Canada with an immigrant visa.

Departing Canada after completing the landing formalities doesn't jeopardize your PR status, it only makes entering Canada harder without your PR cards. After you become a PR, you need a PR card or PR Travel Document to enter Canada as a PR if you are traveling via a commercial mode of transportation (Train, bus, air etc).

You can only enter Canada with your COPR in a personal vehicle (boat or car or on foot).

  • Can you link to a source supporting this answer? – phoog Feb 12 at 12:49
  • Added source, this is also the canonical advice on most Canada related immigration forums. – nikhil Feb 12 at 15:36
  • That source concerns a PR returning to Canada after becoming a PR. I'm not sure how this answers the question, which is whether someone with a PR visa can enter Canada as a visitor, without using the visa, without becoming a PR, with the intention of subsequently leaving Canada and later re-entering with the PR visa and becoming a PR at that time. – phoog Feb 12 at 16:54
  • The OP talks about being approved and receiving a COPR, to get your COPR if you're from a nationality that needs a visa to enter Canada, then you need to submit your passport to CPC; they then return your passport with an immigrant visa and issue you a COPR. Once you've been issued an immigrant visa, previous tourist visas are moot. At this point you can only enter Canada with an immigrant visa. – nikhil Feb 12 at 17:45
  • That last comment seems to address the question posed in the last sentence of the post very effectively. Perhaps you can edit the answer to include it. – phoog Feb 12 at 17:49

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