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I would like to have a Schengen Visa for my honeymoon. Is it possible to have a Schengen Visa now for me and my husband as Syria citizens? We have money and people who can send us an invitation, what is the possibility and what requirements should my husband and I fulfill?

  • Exactly where are you planning to go. At least some Schengen countries are currently not having an operating consulate in Syria due to the unrest, so even if you in theory can apply for and be granted a Schengen visa, you may in practice have problems doing so, e.g. by having to go to Lebanon or Turkey to apply for the Schengen visa, which again may be difficult under the current circumstances. – Tor-Einar Jarnbjo Feb 6 at 12:10
  • @Tor-EinarJarnbjo Not all Syrian citzens live in Syria, of course. – David Richerby Feb 6 at 23:27
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As far as I can see, yes, you can get a Schengen visa. I went to the French government visa website and filled in the form to see if somebody travelling on a Syrian passport would need a visa for a short stay and it said "You need a visa [unless, e.g., you're also an EU citizen]." I assume that, if Syrian citizens were ineligible for Schengen visas, it would have said something like "You cannot get a visa."

You can find the requirements on the application website for the country you wish to visit. Note that, for an ordinary tourist visit such as a honeymoon, you don't need to be invited by anybody.

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From the questions we see here I come to the conclusion that strong ties to your home country are very important, as is a good pattern of income which is more than enough to cover your needs at home.

No embassy has that in its online publications, as far as I know, but when you look at the questions of people who did not get a visa, problem with one of those are very common.

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    Note that "home country" in this case means your country of residence, not necessarily your country of nationality. So if you're living in a country other than Syria, you don't have to prove strong ties to Syria. Basically, "strong ties" means "you have a good reason to leave Schengen at the end of your honeymoon", such as having jobs in your home country. – David Richerby Feb 6 at 11:18

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