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I've been told because of taxes etc in Australia its cheaper to buy round trip flights from outside the country. For example, in the case of going from Perth to Bergen, purchase the ticket in Bergen. How do you do that and is that a fact or fiction?

marked as duplicate by jcaron, David Richerby, Giorgio, choster, Ali Awan Jan 16 at 5:06

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It's mostly fiction. It's hard to find a specific example where this would make a significant difference.

For example Bergen <-> Perth in mid February was about $1100 and Perth <-> Bergen was about the same with one decent option being about $40 cheaper.

There is always variability of flight pricing, so it's hard to do an Apples to Apples comparison. Prices depend a lot on season, day of the week, special events at destination or departure, convenience of the connections, supply and demand, competition and many more.

"Buying outside the country" doesn't matter much either. First you need to define what that actually is. Which country is the one you buy in ?

  1. Country of Departure airport: you can't change that unless you change your travel plans
  2. Country of residence: the airlines don't even ask about this
  3. Country of citizenship(s): only important in terms of visa and entry rules
  4. IP address of the computer you book from: can easily be fudged with a VPN
  5. Billing address of your credit card: may affect fees, but that depends often on the card
  6. Currency used for payment: may affect fees and is subject to fluctuation

Typically none of these makes much of a difference.

  • 1
    How is a Bergen <-> Perth ticket useful if you're in Perth and trying to get to Bergen and back? – Nuclear Wang Jan 15 at 13:44
  • 7. Country where the seller is based. (Doesn't make much of a difference either.) – fkraiem Jan 15 at 14:08
  • @NuclearWang The point was to compare the prices. Most sites will give a price that is local to the point of origin (including currency, specific fares, etc.). If Bergen <-> Perth is not cheaper than Perth <-> Bergen, there's little reason to think Perth <-> Bergen would be cheaper if bought in/from/via/through Bergen rather than Perth. – jcaron Jan 15 at 15:29
  • I believe there are a few exceptions. There's a thread somewhere about some fares in some South American country (Chile? Peru?) which are a lot cheaper when bought in country rather than from abroad (and the whole point of the thread was whether this was based on residence, place of sale...). – jcaron Jan 15 at 15:31

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