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I have a multi-entry UK Visit Visa and have used to visit Belfast multiple times transiting via Heathrow Airport. Can I arrive at Dublin Airport on direct flight from Middle East then catch the bus to Belfast? My in-laws are from Belfast and it seems unfair I am not able to use Ireland's main airport which is easier to get too, no connecting flight and at a much cheaper cost. I tried to apply for the Irish Visit Visa but the rules indicate if your final port is Northern Ireland then you must apply for UK Visa first.

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    What is your nationality? – MJeffryes Jan 15 at 12:38
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    "I tried to apply for the Irish Visit Visa but the rules indicate if your final port is Northern Ireland then you must apply for UK Visa first." Why is that a problem for you? You said you already have a multi-entry visa for the UK - so I don't see any reason you can't apply for the Irish one now based on the requirement you mentioned. – Chris H Jan 15 at 12:45
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    @HonoraryWorldCitizen I see absolutely nothing in this question to suggest OP intends to break any rules. – Chris H Jan 15 at 13:00
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    @Traveller There are exceptions to the rule that you must have an Irish visa to visit Ireland, in certain cases if you have a UK visa. It's not unreasonable to think that they might apply, and certainly not unreasonable to ask the question. I would suggest you are breaking the directive to be nice to new contributers. – MJeffryes Jan 15 at 13:38
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    @HonoraryWorldCitizen it seems to me that Pantilla is trying to determine what the rules are. – phoog Jan 15 at 17:32
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I am assuming from your query that you are from a country which does, in fact, require a visa to visit Ireland (e.g. not EU national).

A visa for visiting the UK does not, obviously, extend to visiting the Republic of Ireland. That said, due to the open border between Ireland and Northern Ireland, you can travel freely across from NI to the RoI and, unless you break a law and are detained by the police, you are free (but not legally entitled) to move around Ireland without fear of being deported.

In your case, however, as you are planning on landing in Dublin, you must apply for an Ireland visa. There is no facility to transit from Dublin to Belfast without entering the Republic of Ireland by which I mean "exiting the port of entry" (there are no direct flights), nor will immigration accept an excuse of "but I'm planning on getting a bus!". I do know someone who went to Ireland (Indian citizen with a UK visa) who thought he didn't need a visa - after a 30 minute detention, he was allowed to enter Ireland with a warning, but that should not be considered the official position of Irish border police!

As you don't qualify for a transit visa, then a shortstay visa would be required. Have a look here for more info: http://www.inis.gov.ie/en/INIS/Pages/Transit%20visas

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    A visa for visiting the UK does not, obviously, extend to visiting the Republic of Ireland To me, this isn't obvious, because in some cases it does – MJeffryes Jan 15 at 17:19
  • @MJeffryes in addition it is not obvious because by analogy with the Schengen area it is easy for someone to presume that the UK and Ireland share a unified visa scheme, even though such a presumption is incorrect. But the inclusion of the word "obviously" in that sentence doesn't invalidate the otherwise correct advice in this answer: someone with a UK visa that doesn't permit entry into Ireland can apply for an Irish visa to travel to Belfast by way of Dublin. I've therefore upvoted the answer. – phoog Feb 14 at 18:18
  • it's the difference between "A visa for visiting the UK does not, obviously, extend to visiting the Republic of Ireland" and "A visa for visiting the UK does not obviously extend to visiting the Republic of Ireland". Yay punctuation. – DJClayworth Feb 14 at 20:09

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