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enter image description here Hey everyone? I've been having some difficulties exchange my old dollar bill. Can anyone please help me? They said it was old. But it is still im a good shape though.

marked as duplicate by Nate Eldredge, Ali Awan, Giorgio, Tor-Einar Jarnbjo, k2moo4 Dec 26 '18 at 9:32

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  • Do you know anyone who will be traveling to the US anytime soon? The bill is perfectly usable in the US; maybe they'll exchange it for you. – phoog Dec 24 '18 at 3:30
  • No I don't know anyone who's traveling anytime soon. ☹️ – Johanna Elisha Saledaien Dec 24 '18 at 9:24
  • I’m not sure if it’s because of the photo orientation but your old $100 seems much larger than the new $100. How sure are you that your old bill isn’t counterfeit money? – RoboKaren Dec 24 '18 at 18:01
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    Neither bill looks real. I presume this is some example photo, not a photo of real $100 bills. – Michael Hampton Dec 24 '18 at 20:27
  • Any US bank, and most (but not all) US retailers will accept the older bills. – Mike Harris Dec 26 '18 at 0:04
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On the plus side, the left signature of the Treasurer of the United States, William Alexander Julian matches the bill's date. The right signature of the Secretary of the Treasury, Henry Morgenthau, Jr. also matches.

Based on pictures of other 1934 series $100 bills online, including from some dealers, there are some features which don't appear to match.

The text below Franklin's picture should say, "will pay to the bearer on demand."

The text on the upper left that starts, "This note is legal tender..." doesn't match what other bills have. The statement is much longer.

One site said to check for raised text on the bill. That's the only security feature at the time. They did state that the raised text could be worn off but then I would expect more general wear on the bill.

  • Who says it's supposed to be series 1934? The picture matches the 1963 series a lot better, including the two differences you point to. – Henning Makholm Dec 25 '18 at 19:18
  • @HenningMakholm by checking when the Treasurer and Secretary of the Treasurer who signed the plate were in office. I assumed OP was asking about the top bill which is (supposedly) much older than the bottom one. – mkennedy Dec 25 '18 at 19:20
  • The resolution is not good enough for me to decode those signatures -- what do you make them out to be? The bottom note looks like the 1996 series, which is indeed newer than the 1963 series. – Henning Makholm Dec 25 '18 at 19:27
  • @HenningMakholm added to the answer. – mkennedy Dec 25 '18 at 20:03
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If you live anywhere near a tourist area, you could ask some US Americans there to exchange it for you. Be aware they may think it’s a scam, especially if you’re a complete stranger to them.

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