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I've heard on my friends who work at an Airline that people use to buy the cheapest ticket they have for the coming months and use it that day to become eligible as chance passenger. Just want to know if this is a myth or a fact?

closed as unclear what you're asking by Michael Seifert, David Richerby, Michael Hampton, Giorgio, Ali Awan Dec 8 '18 at 8:41

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    What would a "chance passenger" be? You mean being waitlisted? – jcaron Dec 7 '18 at 18:00
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    @jcaron I'd suspect this is flying as a standby passenger, except that would normally only work for a ticket (to anywhere) on the day of travel, due to the need to get past security. – origimbo Dec 7 '18 at 18:49
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    I don't see how this could work. For major airlines, the "cheapest ticket" is only changeable (if not completely non-changeable for some LCCs) with payment of a usually-hefty change fee and the difference in fare. You'd be better off just buying a ticket on the spot. Am I misunderstanding something about the process you're describing? – Zach Lipton Dec 7 '18 at 19:04
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    I think OP only has part of the story. Airline personnel (and sometimes their relatives) usually have a privilege that allows them to buy very discounted tickets that allow them to fly standby. They're known as GP (gratuitous passenger), used to cost about 10% of a regular fare (there was a story about it being the cost of insurance or something similar), but indeed, they're standby, lowest priority, just hoping for a seat to be available on the flight. But they're definitely not public fares. – jcaron Dec 7 '18 at 21:25
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Assuming you mean "stand by" than the answer is "typically no, but it depends and it's complicated"

Changing the date of flight for a non-flex ticket will incur a change fee and these days most airlines are pretty strict about collecting these. It depends on the type of ticket, airline policy and your status. United, for example, allows taking a different flight that's close in time to the original flight for free if your status is Gold or higher.

Other exceptions are flex tickets, people that have employee or family relations with the airlines, cases where the new fare is substantially cheaper than the original one, etc.

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