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I have overstayed my holiday visa in the U.S and want to go home to England; how do I go about doing so?

Can the British embassy help me get home to the UK?

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    What exactly is the problem you are trying to solve? If you have a UK passport you can buy a ticket and get on a plane. No passport? No money? Worried about US authorities catching you? What? – user79658 Nov 6 '18 at 9:12
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    Probably wise to hide your name if this is your real name. – BritishSam Nov 6 '18 at 13:15
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    @BritishSam I agree that no good can come of revealing one's name in this situation, but I doubt much bad will come of it either. The US almost certainly already has OP's name and a record of her entry (which she can see for herself at i94.cbp.dhs.gov), and of course there will be no matched exit record until she leaves. – phoog Nov 6 '18 at 14:14
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    Since neither answer mentions it (and it does not directly answer your question), I would note here that you should be aware of the automatic 3- or 10-year ban that may be triggered when you leave the US. If you accrue more than 180 days of illegal presence, you get a 3 year ban from the day you leave the US. If you accrue more than a year of illegal presence, the ban is 10 years. If you think you'll want to return to the US, you should leave before day 180 if at all possible. But because your future credibility as a visitor is worse the longer you stay, you should leave as soon as you can. – phoog Nov 6 '18 at 16:11
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You can just buy a ticket home and leave the USA. No need for help with that.

But you will not easily be able to get back into the USA. Almost everybody who overstayed can not use the 'no visa' option anymore and it will become much harder to get a normal visitors visa. Your embassy can also not help you there, you broke the rules, you suffer.

As mentioned by @phoog in the comments:

I would note here that you should be aware of the automatic 3- or 10-year ban that may be triggered when you leave the US. If you accrue more than 180 days of illegal presence, you get a 3 year ban from the day you leave the US. If you accrue more than a year of illegal presence, the ban is 10 years. If you think you'll want to return to the US, you should leave before day 180 if at all possible. But because your future credibility as a visitor is worse the longer you stay, you should leave as soon as you can.

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    This. No one will check your immigration status, you only show your passport as ID for TSA so you wont have any trouble at the airport, you will have problems visiting the USA in the future, you may get a ban, you definitely will never be able to have an ESTA again, if you don't have a ban you'll have to apply for a visa. You could have problems getting visas and e-visas for other countries too, they often ask if you have ever overstayed in a country. – BritishSam Nov 6 '18 at 13:14
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    "you will not be able to get back into the USA": this overstates the situation. She'll need a visa to return to the USA. The visa may be less likely to be granted, the probability likely depending on the length of the overstay, but not impossible. – phoog Nov 6 '18 at 14:16
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    can't you just cross to Canada somewhere without checks and then get a flight from Canada to the UK? WIll the authorities know you overstayed then? – Travel guy Nov 6 '18 at 14:53
  • @Travelguy are you recommending OP illegally crosses into Canada? They still wouldn't have an exit record from the USA – BritishSam Nov 6 '18 at 15:02
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    @Travelguy Canada and the US share entry information on the land border so the other country can record the person's departure. Mexico would be a better option to leave the US without having the exit recorded, but it would still be necessary to show through other means that she had departed the US on time, which, since she hasn't in fact done that, would constitute fraud. Unlike the overstay itself, this would lead to permanently inadmissibility, virtually ensuring, if it is discovered, that she would never return to the US. – phoog Nov 6 '18 at 16:01
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Answering the specific question, no, it can't. From the government's webpage on the subject:

We cannot:

Pay any bills or give you money because we are not funded to do this and you would not get these bills paid for you if you were in the UK. You should take responsibility for yourself. It would be unfair for those who take out insurance to subsidise those who do not

[...]

Make travel arrangements for you ... because these are private arrangements which are your responsibility to make for yourself

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    She hasn't said why she needs help returning, but depending on the reason, some of the items listed under "what kind of help we can provide" might indeed be of use. Most pertinently, they can issue an emergency travel document. They also offer other support such as "advice and help" for crime victims and other information that might be pertinent. – phoog Nov 6 '18 at 14:22

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