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I retain citizenship in both the UK and the US. I live and study in the UK, and my parents are both English, with British passports.

Essentially, I have received my declaration and attended the ceremony for British Citizenship, and I have started the process of getting my passport. However, I need to travel to the States for Thanksgiving (not exactly life-threatening, I know) but I can't use my BRP anymore because it is invalid. Can I travel just using my US passport without an issue? As in, will the UK let me back in to continue study and generally living here?

My father believes that they will only let me stay for 90 days at most, but if my passport comes by December, then that'll be irrelevant either way hopefully.

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    Can I travel just using my US passport without an issue? As in, will the UK let me back in to continue study and generally living here? How can they stop you from reentering? You are a British citizen whether you have a passport or not, they cannot turn you away when you arrive at the airport. – user 56513 Oct 31 '18 at 16:59
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    @HonoraryWorldCitizen They can't stop a citizen from returning, but they can stop an unknown person from entering. Proving that unknown person is a citizen may be time-consuming and challenging without a valid passport. (Keyword there is, of course, "may" -- it depends on what other documents you carry, the specific immigration officer, etc.) – Nic Hartley Oct 31 '18 at 23:13
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    @Giorgio I don't see how the general advice on that page answers the very specific question here. – David Richerby Nov 1 '18 at 10:59
  • Shouldn't you of been able to get British passport in the USA without a BRP or ceremony? If both of your parents are British(not by decent) then you are automatically British without having to do those things. Unless just your mother was and you were born before 1983 – BritishSam Nov 1 '18 at 11:17
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I can't use my BRP anymore because it is invalid. Can I travel just using my US passport without an issue?

As a citizen of the UK, you have an unrestricted right to enter the UK. The problem will be proving that right if you need to invoke it explicitly. In other words, you might have a bit of a delay entering the UK on your return.

When you enter the UK, you could either show your US passport and say nothing about your UK citizenship, or you can mention that you are a citizen of the UK and show whatever evidence you have of that fact, such as the certificate you received at your citizenship ceremony.

If you do the first, they might somehow see that you are a citizen of the UK and ask you about that. Or, if they don't notice that you're a citizen of the UK, and they also decide that you look like someone who might try to violate immigration law, they might decide to refuse entry. At that point you would have to claim citizenship of the UK in order to avoid being removed.

It's probably better, therefore, to start by showing your US passport and UK citizenship certificate and explain (if needed) that you didn't have time to get a UK passport before your trip.

My father believes that they will only let me stay for 90 days at most.

This is incorrect, even if you use your US passport to enter without identifying yourself as a citizen of the UK, and even if you receive a standard six-month "leave to enter" stamp noting that employment and recourse to public funds are prohibited. Once you've attended the ceremony and received the certificate, you are a citizen of the UK, and your presence in the UK cannot be restricted just because you've entered with a different country's passport. Any stamp purporting to impose such a restriction would have no effect.

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    Hiding behind the US passport isn't likely to go well. Their first question will likely be along the lines of "what is the purpose of your visit?" and it'll all go downhill from there. – Flexo Nov 1 '18 at 8:04
  • Could there be a problem of the airline letting the OP board the return trip to UK without onward travel arrangements nor UK passport? – user41363 Nov 1 '18 at 10:22
  • @Leonhard unlikely. There's no requirement for a visa-exempt visitor to have onward travel arrangements on arrival, just the means to leave. That's not very clear cut, and airlines are not in the business of assessing their passengers finances. – phoog Nov 1 '18 at 13:21
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    @Flexo unless the response is "to stay permanently, and here's my certificate of citizenship to show that I have that right." – phoog Nov 1 '18 at 13:22
  • exactly - I think planning to use the "and say nothing" option is an extremely bad idea. It'll work for the airline most likely, but unlikely any further. – Flexo Nov 1 '18 at 17:11

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