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I recently applied for a schengen visa, and when i got my passport back , i found a paper stapled at the back as a warning that the visa is only for vacation purposes and not work or other things. Now i already know that the embassy has the right to staple on pages of the passport , but i don't understand why they did so on the back cover of the passport. Is it even legal to do so ?

closed as primarily opinion-based by user 56513, MJeffryes, Giorgio, Michael Hampton, David Richerby Oct 22 '18 at 21:42

Many good questions generate some degree of opinion based on expert experience, but answers to this question will tend to be almost entirely based on opinions, rather than facts, references, or specific expertise. If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

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    Many embassies do the same thing. Same thing with some airlines which affix stickers to passports. – user 56513 Oct 22 '18 at 16:51
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    @HonoraryWorldCitizen yes some old passports had stickers on the back but never a paper stapled – Issam Mani Oct 22 '18 at 16:54
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    What is your concern? The potential to damage the passport? – mdd Oct 22 '18 at 17:07
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    @MJeffryes legal in the sense that the passport is the country's property. If i, as the holder of this passport, could be pursued for damaging it in anyway, why should a foreign embassy worker puncture two holes in the back ? And not use the papers inside for their intended usage ? – Issam Mani Oct 22 '18 at 17:14
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    I think if you reframed the question as something like "will I face any issues traveling on a passport with holes in", it would be acceptable. But as it is, this feels like more of a complaint than a question. – MJeffryes Oct 22 '18 at 17:25
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I don't know about the legality of it, but if your passport is one of those that works with the automatic gates, then stapling through one of the stiffer parts of your passport runs the risk of damaging the RFID antenna inside. You might want to check with your passport issuing authority.

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