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So I'm currently working on applying for my UK Tier 5 Youth Moblility Visa. I am a 21 year old from Canada.

I am worried that a past experience in the UK will be a problem, let me explain.

A few months ago I was backpacking across Europe and spent a lot of time in the UK as I lived with some friends there. I was only there under the ordinary 6 month tourist visa. I stayed for around three months and then went back to Canada. Then around three weeks later went back to pass through Gatwick Airport to Stansted Airport to catch a flight to Norway. The woman was a bit suspicious that I was back so soon but I explained I had a flight to Oslo in two days.

Then around a month and a half later, I came back to the UK for the birthday of my friend and her son. Their birthdays are close together. Frankly, when I got there UK immigration was very suspicious because I was back for a third time and soon. Also, as I backpack and hitchhike a lot, couchsurf and do all I can to save money, I have little funds and they were suspicious about that as well.

They detained me, took my fingerprints and interviewed me under recording.

After a few hours, they phoned my friend and then decided I was ok to be let into the UK. They then let me into the UK but put a special stamp in my passport. From what I understand, the stamp signifies that I need to be asked additional questions.

I stayed for around two months as we all made plans to go to Portugal together which I didn't expect. Then we did and later I went to Ireland by myself.

During my time in the UK, my friend paid for my food and let me stay at her place. I got funds from my parents but not through my own bank account. (should I mention this on my application?)

So I was not refused entry, so I've already decided that I don't need to say that I've ever been refused entry into the UK on my application.

But they will be taking my fingerprints when I send the application to the visa center in my city. So I will probably show up on their records. I don't want them to look at me in any bad way whatsoever. I loved the UK and I very much want to live there for two years. Will this hurt my chances?

Should I mention this incident on my application so it doesn't seem like I'm trying to hide it?

I'm thinking if I don't mention it, when they're processing my application and do research they might see me show up on the system and automatically deny me because they're assuming I'm not trustworthy.

Also, will my history in the UK as a tourist and not spending money be suspicious? How can I counteract this? I will have enough money in my bank account to apply but during my time in the UK this bank account was mostly empty as I got help from my parents. I spent very very little money anyways. Around 100 pounds per month.

I could really use support on this. Thank you.

marked as duplicate by Peter M, David Richerby, Giorgio, gmauch, mkennedy Oct 10 '18 at 19:17

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

  • Read my case. I was also fingerprinted, photographed and treated like a criminal however they subsequently let me in although my profile was flagged for subsequent visits until a couple months ago. – user 56513 Oct 8 '18 at 20:06
  • @MusoniusRufus Your situation was very similar to mine, I was there for hours, photographed, fingerprints and interviewed. And your passport stamp looks just like mine. Except I'm now applying for this visa only a few months after this happened? Is there anything you recommend me do? Have you gotten a Tier 5 Youth Moblility Visa since then? Any advice at all would be appreciated. I need all the help I can get. Should I at least explain myself in my application form? – Noble Oct 8 '18 at 20:13
  • @MusoniusRufus Is there any official name for the passport stamp they gave us? Hmm, maybe phoning a certain service center in the UK is an option? – Noble Oct 8 '18 at 20:16
  • @MusoniusRufus Thank you very very much, it means a great deal to me. – Noble Oct 8 '18 at 20:19
  • Why are you asking the same question as what you asked yesterday? travel.stackexchange.com/q/123487/6188 – Peter M Oct 8 '18 at 21:23
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Will this hurt my chances?

It is not a positive event so it definitely will not help your chances. It is not a deal breaker however

Should I mention this incident on my application so it doesn't seem like I'm trying to hide it?

You should not volunteer information with immigration unless it is explicitly asked. If the UK visa forms explicitly asks (been a while since I filled one out), definitely answer truthfully.

I'm thinking if I don't mention it, when they're processing my application and do research they might see me show up on the system and automatically deny me because they're assuming I'm not trustworthy.

That is correct. Fraud or Misrepresentation will lead to a ban, you do not want that.

Also, will my history in the UK as a tourist and not spending money be suspicious?

No. They do not know how much you spent. Plus many visitors spend little especially if they live with family.

How can I counteract this?

By preparing a solid application after reading the questions here especially this, this, this and that and indeed any UK Visa question answered by Gayot Fow

Is there any official name for the passport stamp they gave us?

I thought so however it was explained here that it is a normal entry stamp for non-visa nationals

Overall I think your chances are not bad. Although you made frequent visits successive visits to the UK, the visa you are currently applying for allows you to stay in the UK for an extended period of time. If you have evidence to show a compelling reason you will return to your home country afterwards, you may add it.

I think however that such nomadic behavior and lack of strong economic ties is normal and expected in people in your age group and this is recognized while adjudicating applications for this particular visa type.

  • Ok, this is comforting. Perhaps signed letters from my English friend explaining how she let me stay with her and one from my parents explaining how they helped me financially during my tourist stays even though I spent very little would be helpful. Make sure my application is solid and then maybe elaborate on the detainment fiasco in the "other information" section of my application so they don't think I'm trying to withhold information – Noble Oct 8 '18 at 21:08
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    ECO's have a short time within which to decide on an application. Do not deluge them with unnecessary and or verbose additional information. I would not volunteer the detainment fiasco nor the letter from your friend. A very short note from your parents about how they support you perhaps. – user 56513 Oct 8 '18 at 21:21
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    The longer you wait between visits/applications, the better. That is obvious because it debunks the the applicant must show that they do not intend to live in the UK for extended periods through frequent and successive visits problem. – user 56513 Oct 11 '18 at 9:52
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    Should I explain this as well in additional notes or not bother? Good or bad idea? Do not mention it. I did the same thing in 1998 (i.e stayed longer than I asked for although within the six month permitted period) and because of that the next time I went for a visa, I was denied. Do not even mention it. Listen, you are agonizing too much over this thing. Don't make it complex. Don't make it seem like you are desperate to enter the UK, that is a surefire way to get denied. You are from Canada a very developed nation. Your chances of being denied a visa are minuscule – user 56513 Oct 11 '18 at 19:30
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    @Noble Well, from a practical point of view, what are your intentions for supporting yourself for up to 2 years? Are you planning on / able to stay at your friend’s address, and intending to live extremely frugally on just the minimum funds, or will you get a job or support from home? If you’ll need to work, have you researched where, what, and how much you could earn (eg gov.uk/national-minimum-wage-rates)? Point 21 of the guidance states ‘You must be able to support yourself for the entire duration of your stay without recourse to public funds (benefits provided by the state).’ – Traveller Oct 11 '18 at 21:03

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