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I had been denied entry, deported and banned for 10 years from South Africa in 2016. The reason was that I hold a fraudulent work permit. Then in my home country I have applied for new passport. But the old passport number is written in the new passport. Now my wife is working in UK and I want to join her as a dependent. Will I get UK dependent visa based on my history? Will the UK officials track down my old passport history and deny granting me visa?

closed as off-topic by DJClayworth, cHiEf Immigration vIoLaTer, Newton, David Richerby, Giorgio Aug 30 '18 at 14:07

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    They don’t have to dig it. You will have to mention it on your application yourself. – Hanky Panky Aug 30 '18 at 13:12
  • Hanky panky, thank you very much for early reply. So I can be assured of getting accepted my visa provided I have given all correct information in the application form? – traveller Aug 30 '18 at 13:19
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    @traveller. No. No, no no no, no. – DJClayworth Aug 30 '18 at 13:24
  • By the way, we have a whole site called Expatriates that deals with living and working abroad. This question would be better off there. – DJClayworth Aug 30 '18 at 13:26
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    As part of a dependent visa application, both a current and expired passport/travel documents are required to show travel history. – Giorgio Aug 30 '18 at 14:21
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Yes, this will definitely affect negatively your chances of getting a UK visa.

The visa application asks you about previous deportations and refusals, so you will need to tell the UK authorities about it. If you do not do so, that is considered fraud and will attract an effective ban from the UK as well as South Africa. And yes, it is extremely likely that the UK will find out about your deportation whether you tell them or not. This is true whether or not they know your old passport number. Even in the unlikely event that they do not, if they were to grant you a visa, and then find out that you had lied on the application, that is grounds for later revoking the visa and possibly arrest and deportation.

Your chances of getting a visa are slim. From the UK's point of view you have already shown that you are prepared to lie and cheat in order to enter a country. Why should they believe that you will behave differently in the UK? However in the end it is a decision that the visa officer will make.

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    And yes, it is extremely likely that the UK will find out about your deportation whether you tell them or not. There is no evidence South Africa and UK share such immigration information. – cHiEf Immigration vIoLaTer Aug 30 '18 at 13:36
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We cannot know how the UK will decide.

  • Fraud is a very bad thing on your record; if you lied then, why should people believe you now?
  • Trying to conceal the deportation is a very bad idea. So far you lied to South African officials, but the UK will take lies to an UK official much more seriously.
  • You are not trying to enter for work, you are trying to enter to be with your wife. She has a job, a residence permit, and presumably your marriage is genuine.
  • The marriage is genuine.Off topic but let me clarify here, It all went wrong because of an immigration agent.I came to know that the work permit was fake, when the immigration officer at the airport scanned my visa. Then I had to go back to my home country unfortunatlely with a ban of 10 years. – traveller Aug 30 '18 at 13:55
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    @traveller, your chances are bad if you tell the truth, worse if you lie. Blaming an agent will not improve matters. – o.m. Aug 30 '18 at 14:00

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