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I visited the UK 10 times in my life and never overstayed. On the 11th journey to the UK in 2016, I was arrested because I overstayed 15 days.

I was sure that I was not in breach of the UK law because there are two notations on the visa sticker. The first one says visa granted from:.../.../.... to .../.../.... and the second says validity of the stay: 180 days.

In my honest understanding, I was convinced that the countdown started from the date of entry and not from the date of issuance of the visa. Hence my mistake, but it was made in good faith.

By the way, I made 10 trips before without ever breaking any rule or British law. When I was arrested, I was 58 years old. I did not intend to stay in the UK illegally when I was very young, why would I do so at 58 years old? It's nonsense! I am 60 years old today.

Is there a chance to revoke a ban, if any, and, if so, how? What should I do or say, whom do I contact?

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    You should have been given paperwork when you were removed. What does it say? – RoboKaren Aug 26 '18 at 8:58
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    If you don't have any documents you can post, maybe you can explain better what happened in 2016. Were you arrested at the airport trying to enter? That sounds incorrect, as you would just be refused entry (I believe). – Tomas By Aug 26 '18 at 8:58
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    @krim belkacem Were you given written notification of a ban? 15 days overstay, although a breach, seems too small to attract a ban although it may well make it harder for you to get a visa in future – Traveller Aug 26 '18 at 9:02
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    If there is a ban you cannot revoke it. You can appeal etc but not revoke. That’s not the right word. In any case you sound incoherent. Explain more clearly what happened. – user 56513 Aug 26 '18 at 9:29
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    Where were you arrested? Also before 24th November 2016, overstays less than 28 days were disregarded under normal circumstances. When were you removed? – greatone Aug 26 '18 at 10:22
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You breached the conditions of your visa and were caught. Whether you were arrested or detained, it is likely you would have been served an order for administrative removal. The document you received would indicate any applicable re-entry ban, e.g., 12 months if you left the UK voluntarily and at your own expense.

If you are unclear about whether you are barred from entering the UK for any period of time, you could make a Request personal information held in the borders, immigration and citizenship system.

The removal order would also advise your rights, although, in general, a breach of a UK visa issued for 6 months or less, e.g, the Standard Visitor visa, does not have a right of appeal attached to it.

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    Reading this may also help the OP’s understanding assets.publishing.service.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/… – Traveller Aug 27 '18 at 10:14
  • Traveller: Let me please resume my main question as clearly as possible: – krim belkacem Aug 27 '18 at 14:06
  • Traveller: Thanks and let me please explain as clearly as possible my main question: – krim belkacem Aug 27 '18 at 14:07
  • My main question is as follow: I was arrested, put in custody then in a detention center. I have never refuse to leave UK but on the contrary asked to be sent back to my country as soon as possible. I traveled on my own expenses. Does the fact I was in detention mean that I have been removed forcibly (though I asked for depart) or voluntarily (despite I was in detention)? Because being forced means 10 years ban and voluntarily depart is subject to 1 to 5 years ban. This is what I want to know. And many thanks again. – krim belkacem Aug 27 '18 at 14:12
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    @krimbelkacem please understand that this site is not a forum, so we don't go back and forth in comments. You were told to leave, you did so, and your removal order tells you for how long your ban is in place, and no one here can determine that. Depending on your circumstances, it could be 1 year (or 5, or 10): look at the document and, if you don't have it, use the link in the answer to ask the UKVI. – Giorgio Aug 27 '18 at 14:22

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