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I was reading some comments for a luggage that I'm planning to buy and read that the luggage scuffs easily. Are there anti-scuff spray product that I can use on a polycarbonate shell (type of plastic)? I know I can wrap up my luggage for a fee at airports but I'd rather not.

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    At the risk of sounding flippant, if this is important to you perhaps you should buy some luggage that doesn't scuff easily. – user79658 Jul 29 '18 at 0:08
  • @CannonFodder None taken. I'm curious if a product exists. If it does then a whole new market of luggage is open to me and other people who might be interested about the same thing. – LampPost Jul 29 '18 at 0:13
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A scuff by definition is an abrasion strong enough to abrade material.

Something like a waxy lubricant could reduce some of the scuffing from the baggage machines or conveyor belts but it’s not going to help a scuff that might arise from the bag falling onto the tarmac.

A thick viscous paint or epoxy coating like the stuff you use to spray on truck bed liners might be able to deal with that level of physical damage but that stuff is also heavy and might look bad depending on your aesthetics.

Well-placed duct tape (or hockey tape or helicopter tape) might be one way to reduce some scuffing especially on corners.

Note that airplane companies explicitly state that minor scuffing is part of the normal wear and tear of transportation and will not compensate you for that.

In any case, I think you’ll find most seasoned travelers view the scuffs and scratches on their luggage as part of the well-seasoned look of a frequent flier. There are simply more important things to think and worry about. You buy good quality but not precious luggage that’s designed to take the hits and keep working (albeit with a dent or too) and when it finally breaks, you replace it.

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