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For a student attending an academic conference, these guidelines specify that a standard visitor visa for business must be applied for.

However, the visa application includes a question "Who invited you to the UK?" and requires that the applicant enter the full name of an individual.

The academic conference does not issue letters of invitation, and only issues support letters for visa applications.

In such a scenario, how must this field be filled? It is marked as mandatory.

closed as unclear what you're asking by Giorgio, David Richerby, gmauch, Newton, Jim MacKenzie Aug 10 '18 at 1:07

Please clarify your specific problem or add additional details to highlight exactly what you need. As it's currently written, it’s hard to tell exactly what you're asking. See the How to Ask page for help clarifying this question. If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

  • If you are presenting, then use whoever sent you the acceptance letter, or just the conference chairman? If you have a support letter, then maybe it has a name on it? – Tomas By Jul 11 '18 at 16:17
  • @TomasBy Thank you, that is an option, but is that the correct/acceptable thing to do? – GoodDeeds Jul 11 '18 at 16:18
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    If it feels so important then you probably have to contact them and ask. I don't think it is important, if it is clear you are going to a conference. It will not be the first time somebody applies for a visa for that purpose. – Tomas By Jul 11 '18 at 16:21
  • The problem: there are many people who check conferences just to get invitation and visa (and then never show up to conference). This causes some troubles to organizers, so they usually do no invite people (but speakers). Note: not all business people get invited, so just leave the field clear. If you have a good visa application, the officer will see quickly that your are an academic person and he will check the documentation as such. – Giacomo Catenazzi Jul 12 '18 at 11:26
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    VTC: OP has not further clarified, as asked, making it difficult to respond (or understand whether the correct form is being used). – Giorgio Aug 9 '18 at 16:41