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I have dual citizenship, Ireland and USA, but I will be travelling with my husband who has only a USA passport. I would prefer to use my Irish (EU) passport to enter France.

However, we arrive at Terminal 1 CDG and have to get to the TGV station in Terminal 2. Many people say CDG is a nightmare of a maze and if I enter with my EU passport I'll get separated from him. If you have advice or experience in such a matter, I'd be grateful to hear it.

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    I live in Paris and use CDG a lot (and visited maybe 100 airports in the past). It is not a nice airport (for all kind of reasons) but it is not a maze at all. You have one exit for both "EU" and "All" lanes, you can just wait for him, or queue up with him. T2 is clearly indicated and you get there via a shuttle train. Good luck. – WoJ Jun 17 '18 at 12:09
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As your "family member" under the definition of the freedom of movement directive 2004/38/EC, your husband is a "person enjoying freedom of movement" under the definition of the Schengen Borders Code. He is therefore explicitly allowed to use the lanes marked "EU/EEA/CH." There's no need to be separated at any point.

You might want to bring your marriage certificate in case your relationship is challenged, but my parents have done this several times without being challenged, as have my sister and her husband.

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    Interesting point, how does that work exactly at the border? Should the couple (or family, if there are also applicable children involved) approach the border control agent (immigration / passport control) together? Also, if they enjoy freedom of movement, does that freedom only apply for as long as the couple is physically together in the EU? What if the American citizen goes to the shop and gets stopped by police, without the EU family member, does that not cause a problem regarding immigration status? Or do they get a special stamp in their passport? – JJ for Transparency and Monica Jun 16 '18 at 19:50
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    @JJJ there's no special stamp. They just get a normal one. The police would then only have cause to question the non-EU spouse's status if he or she had stayed more than 90 days in the previous 180. In that case, the defense would be "I am here with my EU spouse who is in the shop." There's no requirement to be in the constant immediate presence of each other. – phoog Jun 16 '18 at 20:18
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    @JJJ I forgot to answer your first question. Yes, they should approach together. I also misread your example, so the defense should be "I am here with my EU spouse who is in the hotel" or wherever. – phoog Jun 16 '18 at 22:11
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The passport control lanes are usually divided into "EU/EEA/Swiss passports" and "All passports". If you queue together in the "all passports" lane, you're fully allowed to present your Irish passport there.

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    They can also use the EU lanes together. See my answer. – phoog Jun 16 '18 at 15:23
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    @phoog: Perhaps. Though last time I entered the Schengen area, the only EU lanes were for automated booths, where I doubt the machines would recognize the subtleties of freedom of movement. – Henning Makholm Jun 16 '18 at 17:12
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    Every time I have seen such machines, they have accepted only those aged 18 years or older in possession of a biometric passport. For others enjoying freedom of movement, whether as minors or as non-EU family or lacking a biometric passport, there is a desk with a person. I have in fact used that desk because my wife did not have a biometric passport until a few months ago. – phoog Jun 16 '18 at 20:21
  • @phoog: Indeed there are desks -- but at the time when I entered, those desks all had an "All passports" sign lit up (and no lines whereas the machines had lines, so I went to a desk). – Henning Makholm Jun 16 '18 at 20:25
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    Hm, where was that? In my experience automatic gates are still the exception rather than the rule. I haven't entered through France in years, and I don't know which French ports of entry have them, if any. – phoog Jun 16 '18 at 21:59

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