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My friend was caught in 2012 travelling to Italy with a fake passport and had his fingerprints taken. Now he wants to apply for a Polish working visa. This time he has a full original passport.

Will those fingerprints create a problem or not? Does the Polish embassy take fingerprints while processing the visa? If yes, are these fingerprints checked against fingerprints taken elsewhere in Europe?

  • Hi, and welcome to Travel.SE. I edited your question do make it a bit clearer. Hopefully I understood correctly what you are asking, if not feel free to edit the question again. – drat May 9 '18 at 2:03
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    Was your friend issued an entry ban from the Italian authorities and if so, for how long? – Tor-Einar Jarnbjo May 9 '18 at 12:01
  • I don't see how the fingerprints themselves would be a problem, rather than the conduct that led to them being taken in the first place, unless your friend intends on concealing his identity. – Acccumulation May 9 '18 at 15:54
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Will those fingerprints create a problem or not?

Probably.

Does the Polish embassy take fingerprints while processing the visa?

Yes.

If yes, are these fingerprints checked against fingerprints taken elsewhere in Europe?

Yes, but not against all fingerprints taken elsewhere in Europe. The Italian authorities may or may not have added the fingerprints to the databases that the Polish embassy will check.

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    Presumably something as serious as using a fake passport would be entered into the Schengen Information System database. Apparently, there is a recently introduced capability for searching the database directly using fingerprints. eulisa.europa.eu/Newsroom/News/Pages/… – MJeffryes May 9 '18 at 9:38
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    @MJeffryes Perhaps, perhaps not. If there is an entry in SIS, it is because an entry ban was issued. SIS is not a blanket database for criminal violations. – Tor-Einar Jarnbjo May 9 '18 at 12:00
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    @Tor-EinarJarnbjo Would attempting to enter on a false passport ever not result in an entry ban (unless the person attempting to enter was an EEA national)? – MJeffryes May 9 '18 at 13:02
  • @MJeffryes I don't know Italian immigration law, but if you with ever means 'in any other country': In German immigration law, I do not see any possibility for the attempt to use a falsified passport to seek entry to cause an entry ban. A subjective reason to refuse future visa applications or entry attempts, perhaps, but not for a definitive entry ban. – Tor-Einar Jarnbjo May 9 '18 at 13:35
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    @Tor-EinarJarnbjo Ok, my assumption was based on UK immigration law, which has an automatic 10 year ban for any kind of "deception". In the case of the UK, even after the ban expiry, it should still show up given the subject's biometrics. Hence, failing to mention the previous ban in a new application would result in another 10 year ban. – MJeffryes May 9 '18 at 13:38

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